Posts Tagged ‘target’

Lucas Glover Golf Swing Analysis!

Friday, July 10th, 2009

As you probably well know, Lucas Glover edged out my former junior golf colleague Ricky Barnes during this year’s U.S. Open 2009, beating numerous great golfers like Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, and David Duval.

Needless to say, let’s go over Lucas Glover’s swing to see what makes him a “major” champion.

At address, Lucas Glover really gets his head behind the ball, his upper spine and head both tilted slightly towards the target.  This slight move helps you to hit the driver on the upswing and also makes sure your head stays behind the ball during the swing.

Lucas has a very strong grip which also goes well with this type of setup.  His feet are about 10 degrees open each.

*Notice that his head is almost over his right foot, not something you’d teach someone but it works for Lucas Glover.

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On the takeaway, Lucas Glover takes away very very wide, sorta like Tiger, I bet he tried to copy Tiger’s move here.

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About half-way, Lucas is still very “wide”.  The way Lucas Glover swing the golf club reminds me almost of a slingshot.  Don’t get me wrong though, I’ve seen a handful of great players who have a “slingshot” golf swing.  This isn’t a bad thing so if you do this, keep doing it.

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At the top of Lucas Glover’s swing (or transition since his hips are already moving down now), Lucas doesn’t overswing, he actually has a pretty compact backswing although it’s hard to notice when you see it in full speed.  Watch carefully as this is when Lucas does the “slingshot” move, he will practically drop his shoulders, arms, and hands straight down.

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I don’t know if you notice here but, Lucas Glover is coming on a very steep angle in contrast to his takeaway and backswing.  This isn’t my favorite way to swing the golf club as your shoulders and hands must compensate for the difference.

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At impact, Lucas Glover drops his body a bit (like everyone) but his feet are still on the ground and his left shoulder to the clubhead forms a perfectly straight line, probably his key to consistency.

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After impact, watch how straight both Lucas Glover’s arms are, that is really good stuff.  And also note his feet are still on the ground!!!  (and yes that is awesome.)

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Lucas Glover’s finish is what I like most about his swing.  See how straight his body is?  This isn’t just good for consistent golf, it’s also great for your back.

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Overall, I’d give Lucas Glover’s swing 8 out of 10.  Lucas didn’t win the U.S. Open with his swing, he also had some good luck with the weather and pairings.  Of course, Lucas has a really good short game and mentally “tougher” than the others.

Here’s Lucas Glover’s Golf Swing in Slow-motion video:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

The stuff you need to learn from Lucas Glover’s Swing:

1. Wide takeaway - Wide takeaway isn’t just for hitting the ball, it also let you swing more free as you can “feel” the centripetal force as you swing back.

If you want to learn to do a wide takeaway, simply put only your right hand on the club and try to swing back like you are holding a slingshot.  If you can feel that, apply it on your real swing.

2. Stable Impact - You want to learn to hit the golf ball without losing your balance.  Next time you are on the range, try to develop a stable impact position by “staying up” through impact.  You will almost feel like you are standing up at impact if you do this right.  In fact, you want to feel like you are standing up during your whole swing.

3. Great Finish – Great finish usually result in great balance and that you end up standing tall like Lucas Glover.  Next time you are at the range, finish your golf swing and stand “tall” afterwards and hold your finish for 3 seconds.  If you can do that, that means you have kept your balance through the swing.

More cool balancing exercises – Take a golf pencil, bite it with your mouth and try to hit full shots without losing your golf pencil.  If you can master this, your body will automatically learn to balance and swing better.

Well, that’s about it for today folks, I will try to have more golf swing analysis later this week so I hope you get better at golf!

Go practice now, don’t just sit there and read golf blogs.

How to Practice with Less Balls at the Driving Range!

Saturday, February 21st, 2009

Today, let me give you a couple tips that will save you money at the driving range, all the while getting a better practice session every time you go out there.

Here’s a couple rules I used to “live” by when I used to play mini-tour events:

1. For every practice shot, make sure you do 2-3 practice swings.  That’s right, practice makes perfect, not simply banging balls.

2. For every practice shot, before the shot, imagine and visualize how the golf ball will react after you hit the ball.

3. For every practice shot, before the shot, imagine and visualize how you will swing.  Visualize yourself swinging that ball perfectly in rhythm and balance.

Believe me, mind does some awesome stuff for golf.

4. For every practice shot, line-up your shot before hitting the ball from behind the ball like a real shot.

Why would you practice as if it “wasn’t” real?  Every shot I practice is the same as the shot I hit under pressure.

This type of mentality helps your conscious to stay the “same” even when playing for real money.  On the other hand, banging a lot of balls perfect does the opposite to you when you play because you are simply not that perfect, not even Tiger.

5. For every practice shot, imagine a real green, bunkers, and fairways.  You should always have a target on your practice shot and it’s even better if you can imagine hitting a certain shot for EVERY practice shot.

6. For every practice shot, hit a different club.  You don’t hit the same club over and over again on the golf course, why would you make it that easy for yourself on the driving range?

Basically, all these tips make you spend most of your time getting ready for your golf shot, just like a real golf shot on the golf course.

Now, if you can’t even hit your pitching wedge past 50 yards, this might not be a good advice for you.  But if you have broken 80 or 90 already and you want to get better mentally, this is how you gotta practice.

Maybe not all the time but most of time, you will reap the benefits of hitting every practice shot after you are mentally and physically ready for it.

Using this method, I usually do 500 practice swing with just 100 practice balls and my practice’s quality goes UP, way high.  And this shows on the golf course if I shoot couple under.

David Duval Swing Analysis!

Thursday, August 14th, 2008

If you are new to golf, you’ve probably never heard of David Duval.  But for me, he’s the #1 or #2 golfer of all-time in the 90s.

For whatever reason that David Duval has not been winning again, let’s take a look at his swing from Doral in 1997 to see what made him “tick”.

One thing I really like about David Duval is the way he finishes his swing with his back straight.  This is really good for painless-back golf.

On the takeaway, David Duval looks pretty good.

At top of his swing, David is in perfect plane.

Between his backswing and downswing, you can clearly tell that David is really transferring his weight back to the left.

Also notice that his head is actually turning towards the target at impact.  David Duval is the only other professional golfer I know who lets his head move freely during impact other than Annika Sorenstam.

I believe this head move can actually help the golfer hit the ball better if done right.  But if you simply move your head at impact, it will probably make you chop the ball more times than not.  To do it right, try following the golf ball as it takes off.

Watch David Duval’s wonderful wind-up finish.  He’s almost wind-up too much but you get the idea here.

Hopefully David Duval does recover from his long-term winning draught.  I have seen signs of him playing better lately at the British Open where he finishes Top 10 for the first 2 days.  Time will tell whether David Duval is able to come back to competitive golf or not but he’s still a British Open champ.

David Duval Links

David Duval Offical Profile at Pgatour.com

David Duval on Wikipedia

Here’s David Duval’s Swing from Doral Open in 97:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Swing Thoughts

Thursday, July 24th, 2008

Today, I hit the ball great again.  I didn’t start hitting the ball great until I could control the length of my backswing.  You see, overswinging causes me to slide my whole body to the right and by controlling my backswing, I was able to control my swing better, thus hit straighter shots online to the target.

So today’s key:

Swing within myself, do not overswing!

Padraig Harrington Driver Swing Analysis

Monday, July 14th, 2008

Padraig Harrington Driver Swing Analysis

With British Open coming up, players like Padraig Harrington will be at advantage as they get to play the course more often than American players.

Let’s look at Padraig’s swing and see his strengths and weaknesses.

I like how Padraig takes his club away from the ball.  He turns everything together nicely.

At the top, Padraig looks real good, starting his lower body as his backswing is finished.

At half-way down, Padraig looks pretty good, maybe a little too much lag than necessary.  (That might be why he hit this ball slightly to the right)

Too much lag can cause the golfer to release too late (or release not at all), causing the ball to fly well right of intended target).

At impact, Padraig hangs back a little too much but looks pretty good other than that.

After impact, Padraig loses control of his left foot, this could really be improved to help his stability and balance.

Overall, Padraig has a really good swing except some minor stuff he might want to concentrate on.

Here’s Padraig Harrington’s Driver swing in Slow-motion:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Ben Hogan Iron Knockdown Swing Analysis!

Wednesday, June 25th, 2008

I have been studying Ben Hogan’s swing for about 20 years now and I’d have to say he’s the best ball stiker in the world.

Here’s some analysis into his iron knockdown swing, which he was very good at and Tiger Woods has copied his moves.

Ben’s takeaway is simply rotation of his triangle formed by his shoulders, arms, and hands to the right. (sorta like shaking hands with person on the right)

There’s no “visible” weight transfer whatsoever here. His belly or the stomach, also turns along with his triangle.

This is probably the most important takeaway you can learn from Ben.

To put it simply:

Rotate your triangle and belly together to the right from a fixed single axis.

At top of Ben Hogan’s swing, you can tell that he’s almost doing a “reverse-pivot” by traditional teachers’ standards. In my opinion, he’s proving to you that there’s no need for a visual weight transfer to the right side. Hey, this picture proves that point.

This might be why there’s so much buzz with the tilt and stack swing when in reality, they are all derivatives of Ben Hogan’s swing.

On the downswing, you can notice Ben’s head has “dipped” 2-3 inches compared to position at address and top of his swing. This proves that the “dip” is actually a necessary natural action to a golfer’s swing provided the golfer doesn’t dip too much. Look at every top player in the world, they “dip” their head a little because it’s human nature.

Do note the fact that Ben’s lower body has aggressivly cleared to his left side while his spine tilt is actually a little straighter, meaning his upper body “moves” toward the target.

This move is inevitable to Ben’s swing in order to hit the ball square, you need to feel like you are on “top” of the ball on the way down in order to extend your arms correctly through impact.

After impact, notice how straight both of Ben’s arms are and the club dissecting between the two arms. This is something Ben is really good at.

At finish, notice how straight Ben’s lower body is and his upper body is pretty straight too. What impresses is how much his whole body is stretched on his finish while he remains in perfect balance with no sign of extra force exertion.

Bloody Ben Hogan, he’s the greatest golfer with the greatest swing ever. Even Tiger has great swing but won’t come close anywhere near Ben Hogan in my opinion.

Now, this is way back in the 50-60s when they had no cameras or any type of visual feedback for the pro golfers. How amazing is his swing when you think of that?

Very amazing indeed that Tiger’s still trying to copy Ben’s moves.

Even after 50 years, every tour pro including Tiger is trying to copy Ben Hogan’s moves, not Jack Nicklauses, not Arnold Palmer, but Ben and only Ben Hogan.  That my friend, IS amazing.

Here’s Ben Hogan’s Iron Knockdown Swing in action:

(Mind you, Ben Hogan was the first master of these knockdown shots, not Tiger. Tiger only copied his moves.)

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Ian Poulter Driver Swing Analysis – 1 Plane Swing

Monday, June 23rd, 2008

Ian Poulter comes as close to a 1-plane swing other than Tiger or Adam Scott in my mind.

Let me show you why.

Take a look at how Ian’s clubface is pretty much dead on-plane. A lot of pro tour players are inside this point, Ian does pretty well of keeping that club wide and extended. I love Ian’s takeaway, everyone should copy this…

At half-way point, Ian is still on-plane, maybe slightly flat but that’s good enough.

At top of Ian’s swing, his hands are “almost” on plane. It’s a little upright but it’s okay.

Also note that his club is pointing way left of target, this usually is okay as long as Ian is on-plane.

At half-way down, Ian is perfectly slightly inside the plane.

At impact, Ian does a pretty good job. There actually space in-between his right elbow and hips. This is a good thing and he has not “dipped” a lot like a other players.

After impact, Ian’s extension shows that he’s on perfect plane. Also note how “tall” Ian is standing. This is great for hitting the ball good and the back.

What a lovely finish.

What to learn from this?

There are lots of ways to swing the golf club. Some can hurt your back some can help your back but both achieve the same results as far as golf shot goes.

You need to pick the right swing mechanics for your golf game so you don’t end up one day with a golf swing you can’t play as you get older.

Swing Tip: Try to stand very very tall when swinging the club. Never stress your body, let the club do the work for you. If you swing the club and you feel tired after couple swings, you are probably not swinging, but “bashing” or “hitting” the ball. Never hit the ball, let it come in the way of your swing.

Watch out as I think this young Ian guy can win lots of tournaments in the near future.

Here’s Ian Poulter’s swing in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Zach Johnson Iron Swing Analysis

Saturday, June 21st, 2008

Zach Johnson Iron Swing Analysis

Zach Johnson’s swing reminds me of Ben Hogan’s swing.  Here’s why:

At takeaway, note how still Zach’s head is.

At top of the swing, Zach’s head is still in the same position.  A lot of golf teachers teach you to transfer weight to the right but Ben Hogan didn’t do that.  (Well he did without moving his head to the right)

At halfway down, Zach actually moves forward with his head and his body, something that Ben Hogan did to prevent him from hitting his bad hook.

At impact, Zach looks pretty good with his left arm and club forming a straight line.

After impact, take a look at how well Zach extends both his arms, and also note that his wrists are straight as hell, no angles anywhere.  This is the most awesome extension I’ve seen, probably slightly better than Tiger’s.

Note how Zach’s arms are extended even at finish, this is something sorta like what Ben Hogan did, although Zach does a little more extension with his left arm than needed.

Zach Johnson shows you how to extend your arms after impact.

Why is this important?

Well, the more you extend and if you extend correctly through impact, you are thereby creating a bigger arc and more room for your clubhead to stay square to the target.  Now if you have bigger arc than anyone else you play with, you are more likely to hit your shots very very straight.

Increase chances of hitting the ball straight, hit more greens, and you score less. :)

Here’s Zach Johnson’s swing in slow-motion:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Swing Tips – Swing at your target, not the ball!

Wednesday, June 18th, 2008

Swing Tips - Swing at your target, not the ball!

Today, I had a chance to video tape the person behind me accidently. Here’s how he could be hitting the ball better.

As you can see in the above picture, his left arm and left hand breaks down after impact. This is a very no-no if you want to hit the ball straight and long.

Now the reason behind that a lot of golfer break down their arms after impact is because they are trying to hit the ball.

How to fix the problem?

It’s easy. Don’t try to hit the ball, try to swing through the ball at your target.

I actually try to hit the target with both of my arms, imagining the target in my mind, never the ball. The ball always comes in the way of the swing.

Swing Tips - Swing at your target, not the ball!

As you can see, my after impact position shows that both of my arms are fully extended after impact. This is the position you want to strive to.

Also note the yellow line and see how straight the point between my right elbow and the club? (That’s the secret. A full release means that even your wrists straighten out near and after impact. The wrists release upwards, not toward the target, this is something a lot of teachers and players do not tell you.)

Mind you, my swing isn’t perfect my any means but I am only pointing out the good parts. (and yes this 2-iron did go straight about 230 yards so I can’t complain)

Today’s Swing Thoughts

I really felt that my hands were soft throughout my swing, meaning I felt like swinging real easy.

To get this feeling, try to maintain the same amount of grip pressure during your whole swing, whether you grip it at level 2 or level 5.

I also really felt like really swinging through the “after-impact” position shown above. That’s actually my swing thought, the image of both of my arms fully extended and released after impact. The lower body must support your upper body so don’t forget the lower body action either.

Now here’s the video in action.

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Tiger Woods and Rocco Mediate Ties for Lead at U.S. Open!

Sunday, June 15th, 2008

Wow, what a great finish by Tiger to hole an 8 footer to tie with Rocco Mediate and force an 18-hole playoff.

I didn’t know Rocco would finish up at the top but he sure did and I must say it’s more luck than his skills.

Tomorrow will be another exciting match to watch as Tiger beats Rocco. I wouldn’t even give Rocco a second chance for a one-on-one dual with Tiger.

On the side note, I hit the ball great today, here’s today’s swing keys:

1. Setup to the target parallel. I can’t believe how many times I start aligning myself to the right of target and get into lots of unnecessary swing flaws. Setup is probably the first thing before even trying to mess with your swing.

2. Feel the cocking of wrists after takeaway.

3. Really feel the lower body and upper body working together on the downswing, holding the lag and extending all the way after impact.

4. Feel like doing a 2-handed basketball pass while holding the lag. It almost feels like you are flinging your wrists about 50 yards right of the target.