Posts Tagged ‘swings’

Weekend Warriors – How to Hit the Ball More Consistently!

Sunday, August 23rd, 2009

Most of us don’t have the time that it takes to perfect a golf swing nor maintain it.  For those weekend warriors, here’s couple swing tips that have actually worked for me:

  • Don’t fight your swing, whether you hit a draw or fade on that day, just play that shot.
  • Keep your swing smooth but make sure your followthrough is longer than your backswing.  This makes sure you accelerate through the golf ball without over-swinging.  This is probably the best tip for keeping your ball flight consistent even if you hardly practice.
  • Keeping your ball flight consistent, whether that’s a slice or hook,  comes first.  If you can hit the ball with a consistent ball flight, you don’t have to hit the ball straight and still score good.  I’ve seen hundreds of scratch golfers who have bad swings but they have consistent ball flights.
  • Don’t ever try to “correct” your swing, just go with the flow and work with your flawed swing.  Again, consistency rules over straight shots.  Even pro golfers don’t try to hit the ball straight.  Jack Nicklaus and Fred Couple hit fades all through major championships, you should pick a side too.
  • Practice more short game and putting, that’s where your advantage is or even Tiger’s for that matter, not in the 300+ yard driver.  Although it’d be good to hit it 300+ yards off the tee, that’s the last thing that’s gonna help you score near par.

I’ve been playing golf for over 20+ years now and more I realize that perfecting your golf swing has more to do with scoring bad  than trying to work with what you already have.

Even me, I have less time to practice than before since I have to run my online publishing business.   I score better when I try to find ways to keep my swing more consistent by doing less.

Less is more, especially in golf.  No matter how many personal golf lessons you get, it’s probably worthless if you change your swing everytime you go out on the golf course.  Stop tinkering and start playing golf.

Here’s a simple exercise if you tend to end up in vicious cycle of trying to fix your swing.

1. Don’t practice on the range anymore.

2. Don’t try to fix your swing on the golf course.

3. Keep playing more golf and try to work on your golf strategy to fit your ball flight.

4. keep doing 1 to 3 until your ball flight is consistent and you have find a working golf course strategy.

5. If you must, fix your swing once every 3 months.

Happy golfing!

Camilo Villegas Iron Swing Analysis!

Monday, September 8th, 2008

Camil Villegas has one of the simplest swings as he never swings beyond 3/4 point and accelerates nicely through the ball while keeping his rhythm super-smooth.

Today we will analyze Camilo’s iron swing and just see how he is able to come up with wins such as the BMW Championships where he beat the top players of the world including Vijay Singh, Phil Mickelson, Anthony Kim, and others.

At takeaway, you can clearly tell that Camil’s clubface is shut (or closed).  But this isn’t too big a problem as long as he gets it open at the top of his swing.

At half-way, you can tell that Camilo has nicely rotated his forearms so the clubface is square in relation to his swing plane.  He’s slightly inside the plane but that’s not a big deal here.

At the top of his swing, Camilo looks very poised and everything stretched out nicely.  Note that his hands and club are not actually back on-plane, a perfect backswing.

At impact, Camilo dips his head down a little (which most players do) but his impact is perfect.

After impact, Camilo looks pretty good.

At finish, Camilo does a great job of standing up straight.

Overall, I am impressed with this young Camilo’s swing as he never over-swings yet his retains his smooth rhythm.

What’s impressive is that this young man is capable of hitting every shot in the bag although he has a tendency to miss his drives to the right.  (probably due to his short backswing when he’s tempo gets too quick)  But with a swing like this, Camilo will never miss left, mostly to the right.

Most players who have short backswing tend to have a quick tempo but Camilo actually has a nice tempo.  (For comparison, check out Tommy Armour III’s swing analysis)

Here’s Camil Villegas’ swing in action:

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Today’s Swing Thoughts!

Friday, July 18th, 2008

Well, the only reason I made this blog in the first place was to record my swing thoughts so I can go back in the future to see the swing thoughts I had when my ball striking and short game was good.

Today was a really good ball striking day, perhaps the best in a long, long time.

Here’s are my thoughts through the swing:

Address

Make sure to setup up with the left foot about 15 degrees open, I have a bad habit of opening up almost 45 degrees, which hinders my balance.

Takeaway

I really want to feel like I am taking my stomach and all of upper body together away from the ball on-plane.

After that, I simply feel the momemtum of my body (stomach and all of upper body) swinging a little further to the top of the swing while cocking the clubs with my hands.

From the Top of the swing

I don’t really feel the top of my backswing anymore as I feel the body constantly moving in action.  But from the top, I really feel like my whole body simply swings inside-out pivoting on my upper body or the spine.

Well, that’s about it.

This also worked really well with the short pitch and chip shots.

Nick Faldo Downhill Iron Swing Analysis

Monday, July 14th, 2008

Nick Faldo Downhill Iron Swing Analysis

For most of 90s, my two favorite golfers were Nick Faldo and Greg Norman.  They always seemed to win tournaments more than others during that time and also shared number one and two of the world back and forth.

Although Nick Faldo may be a sportscaster right now, he may be the best pro golfer to be a sportscaster.

You look at some of the other guys but no one else has an extensive resume like the Masters winner Nick Faldo.

I’ve even bought every book he wrote and although they were all too technical and confusing for most hackers, Nick is really good at details of the golf swing.

Let’s take a look at his downhill iron swing here.

For the downhill iron shot, Nick Faldo sets up with his weight favoring his right and his ball about center of his stance to make up for the hill.

At takeaway, Nick sets his wrists slightly early but looks very good.

At top of Nick’s swing, he has a perfect 90 degree angle between the arm and the club while not swinging more than 3/4 of his full backswing.

On half-way down, notice the 90 degree of lag Nick has.  A lot of tour pros go beyond the 90 degrees which is not necessary and Nick proves the point here.  Too much lag can actually produce a smaller swing arc.

At impact, Nick looks really good.

After impact, Nick chases down the slope with his arms, fully releasing his club.

At finish, Nick looks very good, standing super tall.

Nick Faldo has one of the best swings in golf with one of the best rhythms to go with it.

If he kept playing competitively, he would have won couple more majors but I am surprised he decided to retire from competitive golf.

Here’s Nick Faldo’s downhill iron swing in slow-motion explained by the man himself:

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Having Nick on golf channels is a really good thing.  I rather hear him saying stuff than an Peter Kostis.

Woody Austin Iron Swing Analysis

Tuesday, July 8th, 2008

Woody Austin Iron Swing Analysis

Woody Austin is one of those players I like because of his personality, not his swing.  He cracks me up with some of the things he has achieved.

Let’s look at his swing.  His setup looks pretty good.

Takeaway looks good too.  Woody doesn’t transfer much weight to the right but that’s okay.   (I don’t either because I end up swaying)

At top of Woody’s swing, Woody looks very good.  Pay attention to his lower body action.

At half-way down, take a look at how well Woody has transferred his weight to the left.  This reminds me of Ben Hogan.

At impact, notice how far his hips have transferred and how straight his left arm and the club is.

After impact, Woody is still in really great shape.

Woody Austin might not win a lot of tournaments but heck, he’s always on the leaderboard.

His swing might be one of the best hidden swings on the PGA Tour.

Here’s Woody Austin’s swing in slow motion:

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Jim Furyk Driver Swing Analysis

Monday, July 7th, 2008

Jim Furyk has always been one of my golfing heroes due to the fact that he’s swing is probably the weirdest on the PGA Tour yet he is so successful.

Although Jim Furyk might breaks all rules of physics and textbook teaching, I will prove today that he does have one of the best after impact positions in golf.

At setup, Jim’s hands are pretty much “glued” to his thighs and he stands very very close to the ball.

On takeaway, Jim’s clubface is shut and a little inside the plane.

At half-way, Jim is actually on-plane with the hands but his club is very upright.

At the top of the swing, Jim is pretty much trying to get his hands as vertical as he can.  This is not a bad thing as even Jack Nicklaus tells you to do this at one point in his career.

Vertical swings have been great for hitting the ball very high.

Now the greatest part about Jim is that he re-routes his club back into perfect hitting position as seen here.

He’s actually slightly inside the plane, allowing a perfect setup for inside-out swing.

At impact, Jim must turn his hips, shoulders, head, and everything except the club in order to square the clubface.   Not the easiest way to swing but watch for the next action.

Check out how perfectly Jim’s club is on-plane.  This is something that almost every top golfer does regardless of how they swing the club back.

This is why Jim is on the PGA Tour.

Great finish, and another legendary swing that no one will ever be able to copy.

Here’s Jim Furyk’s driver in action:

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Tom Pernice Jr. Driver Swing Analysis

Saturday, July 5th, 2008

Here’s a swing analysis of Tom Pernice Jr., who is currently leading the AT&T National tournament at 10 under par.

At takeaway, Tom is in good position. (he’s slightly inside the plane but that’s okay as many tour pros use this position)

At half-way, Tom is slightly inside the plane, which is perfectly fine.

At the top of his swing, Tom is perfectly on-plane.

On the downswing, Tom is slightly inside the plane, meaning he will he from the inside out.

At impact, Tom looks pretty good although his arms could be streched a little more.

After impact, Tom is slightly inside the plane. Usually, most tour players are outside the plane at this point but Tom’s club is slightly inside because he sorta swings more “around” himself. This is not a super bad thing but it can cause some really bad duck hooks at tiimes.

Finish is textbook for Tom as his body stands very tall and high.

Here’s Tom Pernice Jr.’s driver swing in slow-motion:

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Here’s Tom Pernice Jr.’s driver swing in action:

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Ian Poulter Driver Swing Analysis – 1 Plane Swing

Monday, June 23rd, 2008

Ian Poulter comes as close to a 1-plane swing other than Tiger or Adam Scott in my mind.

Let me show you why.

Take a look at how Ian’s clubface is pretty much dead on-plane. A lot of pro tour players are inside this point, Ian does pretty well of keeping that club wide and extended. I love Ian’s takeaway, everyone should copy this…

At half-way point, Ian is still on-plane, maybe slightly flat but that’s good enough.

At top of Ian’s swing, his hands are “almost” on plane. It’s a little upright but it’s okay.

Also note that his club is pointing way left of target, this usually is okay as long as Ian is on-plane.

At half-way down, Ian is perfectly slightly inside the plane.

At impact, Ian does a pretty good job. There actually space in-between his right elbow and hips. This is a good thing and he has not “dipped” a lot like a other players.

After impact, Ian’s extension shows that he’s on perfect plane. Also note how “tall” Ian is standing. This is great for hitting the ball good and the back.

What a lovely finish.

What to learn from this?

There are lots of ways to swing the golf club. Some can hurt your back some can help your back but both achieve the same results as far as golf shot goes.

You need to pick the right swing mechanics for your golf game so you don’t end up one day with a golf swing you can’t play as you get older.

Swing Tip: Try to stand very very tall when swinging the club. Never stress your body, let the club do the work for you. If you swing the club and you feel tired after couple swings, you are probably not swinging, but “bashing” or “hitting” the ball. Never hit the ball, let it come in the way of your swing.

Watch out as I think this young Ian guy can win lots of tournaments in the near future.

Here’s Ian Poulter’s swing in action:

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Nick Faldo explains weight transfer

Saturday, June 21st, 2008

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Here’s a good video of Nick Faldo explaining how to transfer your weight during a golf swing.

Although this is true, there’s a lot of new “swings” out on there that might confuse you.

What to take from it?

Well, I do like the part that you should wait until after hitting the ball to completely transfer your weight to the left.

I will have to try this in detail more next time I am on the range.

Nick Price Driver Swing Analysis

Saturday, June 21st, 2008

Nick Price Driver Swing Analysis

I remember seeing Nick Price for the first time on TV, his hair used to stick up all the time a lot more than most other tour pros.  Anyways, I have always been a big fan of Nick Price since the 90s, let’s look at how his swing is.

Btw, he’s a student of David Leadbetter, so he swings on the yellow plane. (We will have to term the yellow plane swingers as 90s swingers.  I also have been guilty of practicing the yellow plane for about 10 years of my life but that’s the 90s, let’s focus on the true swing plane here)

At halfway back, Nick does the perfect match with the yellow plane.  I’d rather see him more outside near the red plane.

At the top, Nick does get back on to the plane.

Surprisingly, Nick does come back to the yellow plane before impact.  This is actually harder to do and its only because Nick’s really good at it.  Most tour pros would come down the red plane line.

At impact, Nick is somewhat neat the red plane.

Now, a lot of pro golfers and teachers still rely on the 2-plane swing, which is combination of the yellow and the red plane.  This is too confusing and there’s too many moving parts.

If you want to swing on 1-plane swing like Tiger or Moe Norman, you will need to concentrate on getting your clubhead on one plane only.