Posts Tagged ‘Slow Motion’

How to Take Slow Motion Golf Swing Videos!

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

I’ve actually noticed bunch of YouTube videos online of these awesome slow motion golf swing videos and noticed that everyone was using selective Casio Exilim series, which can do like up to 6,000 frames per second.

I found that these cameras below will let you take super slow motion golf swing videos:

  • Casio Exilim EX-FC100 – These go for about $219.95 on Amazon, really good deal for capturing up to 1000 frames per second, which beats most other digital cameras for the price and purpose of taking slow motion golf swing videos.
  • Casio Exilim FH20 – This is the higher end version that can cost about $550.  If you want to use it more than a slow-motion golf swing camera, this might be a good way to invest more and get more out of it.

Here’s some videos showing the capabilities of these Casio Exlim digital cameras:

Slow-motion golf swing with Casio Exilim EX-FC100:

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Slow-motion golf swing with Casio Exilim FH20:

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Of course, I don’t really advice to you analyze your own swing unless you are at least an 8 handicap and have some experience tinkering with your own swing.   Otherwise, you might be better off getting a real golf pro to look at your swing.

Also, you can use V1 swing software to analyze your swing.

I should be getting the cheaper EX-FC100 to test it out soon, I need one really bad, technology has gotten so good, it’s unbelievable!

UPDATE: I also found that Casio Exilim EX-FS10 does slow motion golf swing videos too, the cheapest of all at $179.

Parker McLachlin Iron Swing Analysis

Tuesday, August 5th, 2008

Let’s take a look at Parker McLachlin’s iron swing, the winning swing of Reno Tahoe Open.  (Too bad Michelle Wie didn’t make the cut AGAIN!)

At takeaway, notice that Parker’s clubface is actually pointing down at the ground, a little too closed.   This causes lots of pulls and balls that will start left and go left.  It’s best to have rotated a little more here for crisp contact.

At half-way, Parker looks pretty good.

At top of his swing, Parker is in perfect plane.

At half-way down, Parker looks great.

After impact, Parker is slightly outside the plane, meaning he swung slightly inside-out.  Very good stuff.

Parker may have a pretty good swing and he has won a PGA Tour event to prove it with a round of 10 under on Friday of 62.

Here’s Parker McLachlin’s iron swing in slow motion:

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Chez Reavie Driver Swing Analysis!

Sunday, July 27th, 2008

Chez Reavie Driver Swing Analysis!

Here’s a driver swing analysis of today’s Canadian Open winner, Chez Reavie.

At address, Chez really stands tall, almost falling backwards but this is preferable way to swing than “crouching” over the ball.

At takeaway, Chez gets a little too inside but not too bad.

Chez gets really flat at this point due to his upright address but this is fine.

At the top, Chez gets back on-plane as seen here.

Half-way down, you can tell, Chez is in great position to hit the ball with the club inside the plane.

Impact looks perfect.

After impact, Chez gets back on perfect plane, sign of great drives.

The finish.

Here’s Chez Reavie’s swing in slow motion:

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Congrats to today’s Candian Open win and your first Chez! :)

Nick Faldo Downhill Iron Swing Analysis

Monday, July 14th, 2008

Nick Faldo Downhill Iron Swing Analysis

For most of 90s, my two favorite golfers were Nick Faldo and Greg Norman.  They always seemed to win tournaments more than others during that time and also shared number one and two of the world back and forth.

Although Nick Faldo may be a sportscaster right now, he may be the best pro golfer to be a sportscaster.

You look at some of the other guys but no one else has an extensive resume like the Masters winner Nick Faldo.

I’ve even bought every book he wrote and although they were all too technical and confusing for most hackers, Nick is really good at details of the golf swing.

Let’s take a look at his downhill iron swing here.

For the downhill iron shot, Nick Faldo sets up with his weight favoring his right and his ball about center of his stance to make up for the hill.

At takeaway, Nick sets his wrists slightly early but looks very good.

At top of Nick’s swing, he has a perfect 90 degree angle between the arm and the club while not swinging more than 3/4 of his full backswing.

On half-way down, notice the 90 degree of lag Nick has.  A lot of tour pros go beyond the 90 degrees which is not necessary and Nick proves the point here.  Too much lag can actually produce a smaller swing arc.

At impact, Nick looks really good.

After impact, Nick chases down the slope with his arms, fully releasing his club.

At finish, Nick looks very good, standing super tall.

Nick Faldo has one of the best swings in golf with one of the best rhythms to go with it.

If he kept playing competitively, he would have won couple more majors but I am surprised he decided to retire from competitive golf.

Here’s Nick Faldo’s downhill iron swing in slow-motion explained by the man himself:

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Having Nick on golf channels is a really good thing.  I rather hear him saying stuff than an Peter Kostis.

Padraig Harrington Driver Swing Analysis

Monday, July 14th, 2008

Padraig Harrington Driver Swing Analysis

With British Open coming up, players like Padraig Harrington will be at advantage as they get to play the course more often than American players.

Let’s look at Padraig’s swing and see his strengths and weaknesses.

I like how Padraig takes his club away from the ball.  He turns everything together nicely.

At the top, Padraig looks real good, starting his lower body as his backswing is finished.

At half-way down, Padraig looks pretty good, maybe a little too much lag than necessary.  (That might be why he hit this ball slightly to the right)

Too much lag can cause the golfer to release too late (or release not at all), causing the ball to fly well right of intended target).

At impact, Padraig hangs back a little too much but looks pretty good other than that.

After impact, Padraig loses control of his left foot, this could really be improved to help his stability and balance.

Overall, Padraig has a really good swing except some minor stuff he might want to concentrate on.

Here’s Padraig Harrington’s Driver swing in Slow-motion:

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Woody Austin Iron Swing Analysis

Tuesday, July 8th, 2008

Woody Austin Iron Swing Analysis

Woody Austin is one of those players I like because of his personality, not his swing.  He cracks me up with some of the things he has achieved.

Let’s look at his swing.  His setup looks pretty good.

Takeaway looks good too.  Woody doesn’t transfer much weight to the right but that’s okay.   (I don’t either because I end up swaying)

At top of Woody’s swing, Woody looks very good.  Pay attention to his lower body action.

At half-way down, take a look at how well Woody has transferred his weight to the left.  This reminds me of Ben Hogan.

At impact, notice how far his hips have transferred and how straight his left arm and the club is.

After impact, Woody is still in really great shape.

Woody Austin might not win a lot of tournaments but heck, he’s always on the leaderboard.

His swing might be one of the best hidden swings on the PGA Tour.

Here’s Woody Austin’s swing in slow motion:

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Anthony Kim Driver Swing Analysis

Saturday, July 5th, 2008

Okay, today, we will do a “real” swing analysis of Anthony Kim’s swing. (unlike my older post on Anthony Kim’s swing video only)

Now, this young man gas a great swing and might start taking over PGA Tour with multiple wins.

At takeaway, Anthony is a little too much inside. (This is what the “traditional” golf teachers teach you. But don’t be fooled, the follow-through will prove that Anothony “came back” to the right plane to hit the ball, which almost every pro tour golfer does)

At half-way, Anthony is still way too inside but that’s okay as it will get from here on.

At top os his swing, you can see how well his hands, and clubface are in-plane. (The four diagonal lines represent the true plane of the golf swing)

At downswing, Anthony is slightly inside the plane, which is perfectly acceptable.

At impact, notice how his left arms is straight and right arms slightly bent like at address.

Now what impresses me about Anthony Kim’s swing is not his takeaway or backswing but right after impact.

As you can see, his clubface is almost dead-on or slightly outside the plane. This movement is actually the best move. (Players like Ben Hogan and Tiger Woods do this)

After impact, it gets even better as Anthony’s club stays on-plane.

At finish, check out how controlled his right foot is, it’s barely coming up.

What can you learn from Anthony Kim’s swing?

There are many ways to swing the club. Try to focus on getting that club on-plane at the top of your swing and after impact.

Even most tour pros have completely different opinions on how to swing on-plane but their after impact positions will be the same.

Here’s Anthony Kim’s swing in slow-motion (SWING VISION):

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Tom Pernice Jr. Driver Swing Analysis

Saturday, July 5th, 2008

Here’s a swing analysis of Tom Pernice Jr., who is currently leading the AT&T National tournament at 10 under par.

At takeaway, Tom is in good position. (he’s slightly inside the plane but that’s okay as many tour pros use this position)

At half-way, Tom is slightly inside the plane, which is perfectly fine.

At the top of his swing, Tom is perfectly on-plane.

On the downswing, Tom is slightly inside the plane, meaning he will he from the inside out.

At impact, Tom looks pretty good although his arms could be streched a little more.

After impact, Tom is slightly inside the plane. Usually, most tour players are outside the plane at this point but Tom’s club is slightly inside because he sorta swings more “around” himself. This is not a super bad thing but it can cause some really bad duck hooks at tiimes.

Finish is textbook for Tom as his body stands very tall and high.

Here’s Tom Pernice Jr.’s driver swing in slow-motion:

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Here’s Tom Pernice Jr.’s driver swing in action:

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Zach Johnson Iron Swing Analysis

Saturday, June 21st, 2008

Zach Johnson Iron Swing Analysis

Zach Johnson’s swing reminds me of Ben Hogan’s swing.  Here’s why:

At takeaway, note how still Zach’s head is.

At top of the swing, Zach’s head is still in the same position.  A lot of golf teachers teach you to transfer weight to the right but Ben Hogan didn’t do that.  (Well he did without moving his head to the right)

At halfway down, Zach actually moves forward with his head and his body, something that Ben Hogan did to prevent him from hitting his bad hook.

At impact, Zach looks pretty good with his left arm and club forming a straight line.

After impact, take a look at how well Zach extends both his arms, and also note that his wrists are straight as hell, no angles anywhere.  This is the most awesome extension I’ve seen, probably slightly better than Tiger’s.

Note how Zach’s arms are extended even at finish, this is something sorta like what Ben Hogan did, although Zach does a little more extension with his left arm than needed.

Zach Johnson shows you how to extend your arms after impact.

Why is this important?

Well, the more you extend and if you extend correctly through impact, you are thereby creating a bigger arc and more room for your clubhead to stay square to the target.  Now if you have bigger arc than anyone else you play with, you are more likely to hit your shots very very straight.

Increase chances of hitting the ball straight, hit more greens, and you score less. :)

Here’s Zach Johnson’s swing in slow-motion:

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Justin Leonard Driver Swing Analysis

Sunday, June 8th, 2008

Justin Leonard has a great swing, let’s look at them in action.

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