Posts Tagged ‘s driver’

Padraig Harrington Driver Swing Analysis

Monday, July 14th, 2008

Padraig Harrington Driver Swing Analysis

With British Open coming up, players like Padraig Harrington will be at advantage as they get to play the course more often than American players.

Let’s look at Padraig’s swing and see his strengths and weaknesses.

I like how Padraig takes his club away from the ball.  He turns everything together nicely.

At the top, Padraig looks real good, starting his lower body as his backswing is finished.

At half-way down, Padraig looks pretty good, maybe a little too much lag than necessary.  (That might be why he hit this ball slightly to the right)

Too much lag can cause the golfer to release too late (or release not at all), causing the ball to fly well right of intended target).

At impact, Padraig hangs back a little too much but looks pretty good other than that.

After impact, Padraig loses control of his left foot, this could really be improved to help his stability and balance.

Overall, Padraig has a really good swing except some minor stuff he might want to concentrate on.

Here’s Padraig Harrington’s Driver swing in Slow-motion:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Chad Campbell Driver Swing Analysis

Saturday, July 12th, 2008

Chad Campbell Driver Swing Analysis

Chad Campbell is one of those PGA tour players who don’t have a perfect swing.  As you can see here, Chad sets up to the ball with a very narrow stance for a driver.  A big no-no, but he can still play.

Here’s his backswing.  He gets behind the ball real good even with his small stance.  I wouldn’t say it’s pretty but it gets the job done.

After impact, Chad does a good job of extending his arms but his left foot comes off the ground, a sign of real instability.  Of course, Tiger has/had this problem too but Chad really needs to work on his swing if he’s serious about winning more tournaments.

Either that or he can go work on his short game/putting more.

I don’t bet on Chad winning this week unless he holes every putt he sees.

Here’s Chad Campbell’s Driver swing in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Eric Axley Driver Swing Analysis

Saturday, July 12th, 2008

Eric Axley Driver Swing Analysis

Eric Axley is one of those lefty PGA tour pros who has a great potential and it looks like he’s tied for the lead at this week’s John Deer Classic.

Let’s take a look at his swing.

At takeaway, Eric gets very inside, which might be a problem if he doesn’t re-route his club but he does on the next position.

At top of his swing, Eric gets back on perfect plane.

At impact, Eric looks pretty good, maybe his head dips a little too much and his left foot could be down a little more.

After impact, Eric is in really good position with his hands and club outside the plane, meaning he swung inside-out.

Finish looks okay, he could stand up little straighter.

In conclusion, Eric Axley has a pretty good swing but could be improved a lot more.  He swings a little too much inside-out as seen on his takeaway and followthrough.  I imagine his misses are to his left under a lot of pressure.

He probably won win this week but watch out for this young man in the future.

Here’s Eric Axley’s Driver swing in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Will McKenzie Driver Stack and Tilt Swing Analysis

Friday, July 11th, 2008

Will McKenzie is leading today over at John Deere Classic.  He shot 65 yesterday and 64 today.

Let’s look at his stack and tilt swing to see what makes him “tick”.

First of all, I’d like to say that Will has a really simple looking swing, it looks really good.

At address, you will notice that Will stays real “balanced” in the center, not tilting his shoulders much.  This is great way to swing.  Now, pay attention to the triangle formed by his arms and the club.

At takeaway, Will breaks his wrists slightly early but that’s not a problem as his triangle looks great.

At top of Will’s swing, Will looks really good, with little or no backswing weight transfer (his head stays in the same position as at address) and he has a really great “width”.  Notice how far above his head the hands are.

At half-way down, Will looks pretty good again although his right foot could be more relaxed.

At impact, will really gets his hands ahead of the ball but stays in perfect balance.

After impact, WIll’s follow-through is a mirror-image of his takeaway.  Again, great stuff.

Will’s finish is probably one of the best I’ve seen.  His standing almost perfectly vertical as you can see the line formed by his legs and upper body.  This is really good for playing golf when you get older and also helps your back.  (no straining your back when you finish like this)

Overall, I am really impressed at Will’s swing because of his rhythm and simplicity.  He makes it look “easy”.

I wouldn’t be surprised if he won this weekend, good luck Will.

Here’s Will McKenzie’s Driver swing in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Here’s Will McKenzie’s Driver swing in action from the back, it looks really good:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Robert Allenby Driver Swing Analysis

Tuesday, July 8th, 2008

Robert Allenby is one of those guys who don’t win often but ALWAYS finishes up at Top 10 at most PGA tournaments.

Let’s look at the Aussie’s swing.

At address, Robert looks pretty good with a textbook setup.

At takeaway, Robert is in perfect plane.

At half-way, Robert goes slightly upright but it’s okay.

At top os Robert’s swing, he is slightly upright again but it’s acceptable.

Half-way down, Robert is poised nicely for an inside-out hit.

At impact, Robert looks perfect.  I love this position where hips and shoulders are just slightly open while the left arm and the club are very straight with the right elbow bent slightly.

After impact, Robert’s club is on perfect plane, standing very tall.  All great stuff, no wonder this guy’s always on the leaderboard.

Finish looks great.  Now, Robert Allenby’s swing really reminds me of Stuart Appleby’s swing.  Is that because they are both Aussies and the fact that both of their last names end in “by”?

Lol… we never know but Robert Allenby must be a distant cousin of Stuart Appleby for sheezy.

Here’s Robert Allenby’s Driver swing in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Rod Pampling Driver Swing Vision Swing Analysis

Monday, July 7th, 2008

Let’s look at Rod Pampling’s driver swing here.  He has a swing that “over-rotates” during the backswing and the follow-through.

At address, Rod is a little bit too much over the ball but sitting very tall.

At takeaway, Rod’s club is nicely on-plane except notice that even his clubface is on-plane. (Normally, you want the clubface edge pointing up at the sky at this point)

At half-way point, Rod is in perfectly on-plane, nice….

Again, at the top, Rod is doing really well.

At half-way down, Rod is doing great again, pretty much on-plane.

At impact, notice how much Rod’s hips and shoulders have turned.  This is because he “over-rotates” his body on the backswing.  It’s not an easy swing to repeat.

After impact, Rod is slightly inside the plane, meaning he used his wrists a little to square the club.

Again, this is probably due to his over-rotations.

At finish, Rod looks pretty good.

Rod Pampling could really benefit from swinging with less rotation.  Then again, if he has been swinging like this for last 20 years, I wouldn’t change it, just go working on my putting more.

Here’s Rod Pampling’s swing in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Jim Furyk Driver Swing Analysis

Monday, July 7th, 2008

Jim Furyk has always been one of my golfing heroes due to the fact that he’s swing is probably the weirdest on the PGA Tour yet he is so successful.

Although Jim Furyk might breaks all rules of physics and textbook teaching, I will prove today that he does have one of the best after impact positions in golf.

At setup, Jim’s hands are pretty much “glued” to his thighs and he stands very very close to the ball.

On takeaway, Jim’s clubface is shut and a little inside the plane.

At half-way, Jim is actually on-plane with the hands but his club is very upright.

At the top of the swing, Jim is pretty much trying to get his hands as vertical as he can.  This is not a bad thing as even Jack Nicklaus tells you to do this at one point in his career.

Vertical swings have been great for hitting the ball very high.

Now the greatest part about Jim is that he re-routes his club back into perfect hitting position as seen here.

He’s actually slightly inside the plane, allowing a perfect setup for inside-out swing.

At impact, Jim must turn his hips, shoulders, head, and everything except the club in order to square the clubface.   Not the easiest way to swing but watch for the next action.

Check out how perfectly Jim’s club is on-plane.  This is something that almost every top golfer does regardless of how they swing the club back.

This is why Jim is on the PGA Tour.

Great finish, and another legendary swing that no one will ever be able to copy.

Here’s Jim Furyk’s driver in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Tom Pernice Jr. Driver Swing Analysis

Saturday, July 5th, 2008

Here’s a swing analysis of Tom Pernice Jr., who is currently leading the AT&T National tournament at 10 under par.

At takeaway, Tom is in good position. (he’s slightly inside the plane but that’s okay as many tour pros use this position)

At half-way, Tom is slightly inside the plane, which is perfectly fine.

At the top of his swing, Tom is perfectly on-plane.

On the downswing, Tom is slightly inside the plane, meaning he will he from the inside out.

At impact, Tom looks pretty good although his arms could be streched a little more.

After impact, Tom is slightly inside the plane. Usually, most tour players are outside the plane at this point but Tom’s club is slightly inside because he sorta swings more “around” himself. This is not a super bad thing but it can cause some really bad duck hooks at tiimes.

Finish is textbook for Tom as his body stands very tall and high.

Here’s Tom Pernice Jr.’s driver swing in slow-motion:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Here’s Tom Pernice Jr.’s driver swing in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Lorena Ochoa Driver Swing Analysis

Tuesday, June 10th, 2008

Lorena is a very good pro who exemplifies her game with her great swing.

Let’s take a closer look at how the champ does it.

At takeaway, Lorena is perfectly on-plane. A lot of the top pros are moving towards the 1-plane swing, which is following that red plane line.

At 3/4 backswing, Lorena gets slightly upright. This is still okay though.

At the top of her swing, Lorena is definitely slightly too upright and her club “goes across the line”, meaning it’s pointing right of the target. She will have to “re-route” her arms slightly to hit the ball square and if she doesn’t, she will hit a block to the right. This is something she could fix in the future. Greg Norman used to play like this for years and a lot of other tour pros do play “across” the line, but do as they say, not as they do.

Being slightly upright and over the line is actually not a bad thing. It’s easier to control than being slightly flat and under the line.

On the downswing, Lorena “drops” her arms to get the club back in position which is fine here.

At impact, Lorena looks perfect.

After impact, Lorena looks good too. Take a close look at how her elbows, arms, and hands have formed a “triangle”, this is really good stuff.

Conclusion

If Lorena Ochoa is winning every other tournament she plays, she shouldn’t change her swing but if she stops winning or has some time off to re-work her swing, I’d recommend to get slightly flatter at the top of her swing and that should automatically help the club point more parallel to to the target line instead of going “across-the-line” at the top of her swing.

Lorena’s takeaway looks reaaal good though, I’d recommend everyone to copy that.

Here’s Lorena Ochoa’s driver in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Justin Leonard Driver Swing Analysis

Sunday, June 8th, 2008

Justin Leonard has a great swing, let’s look at them in action.

(more…)