Posts Tagged ‘right foot’

Lucas Glover Golf Swing Analysis!

Friday, July 10th, 2009

As you probably well know, Lucas Glover edged out my former junior golf colleague Ricky Barnes during this year’s U.S. Open 2009, beating numerous great golfers like Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, and David Duval.

Needless to say, let’s go over Lucas Glover’s swing to see what makes him a “major” champion.

At address, Lucas Glover really gets his head behind the ball, his upper spine and head both tilted slightly towards the target.  This slight move helps you to hit the driver on the upswing and also makes sure your head stays behind the ball during the swing.

Lucas has a very strong grip which also goes well with this type of setup.  His feet are about 10 degrees open each.

*Notice that his head is almost over his right foot, not something you’d teach someone but it works for Lucas Glover.

lucas-glover-golf-swing-1

On the takeaway, Lucas Glover takes away very very wide, sorta like Tiger, I bet he tried to copy Tiger’s move here.

lucas-glover-golf-swing-2

About half-way, Lucas is still very “wide”.  The way Lucas Glover swing the golf club reminds me almost of a slingshot.  Don’t get me wrong though, I’ve seen a handful of great players who have a “slingshot” golf swing.  This isn’t a bad thing so if you do this, keep doing it.

lucas-glover-golf-swing-3

At the top of Lucas Glover’s swing (or transition since his hips are already moving down now), Lucas doesn’t overswing, he actually has a pretty compact backswing although it’s hard to notice when you see it in full speed.  Watch carefully as this is when Lucas does the “slingshot” move, he will practically drop his shoulders, arms, and hands straight down.

lucas-glover-golf-swing-4

I don’t know if you notice here but, Lucas Glover is coming on a very steep angle in contrast to his takeaway and backswing.  This isn’t my favorite way to swing the golf club as your shoulders and hands must compensate for the difference.

lucas-glover-golf-swing-5

At impact, Lucas Glover drops his body a bit (like everyone) but his feet are still on the ground and his left shoulder to the clubhead forms a perfectly straight line, probably his key to consistency.

lucas-glover-golf-swing-6

After impact, watch how straight both Lucas Glover’s arms are, that is really good stuff.  And also note his feet are still on the ground!!!  (and yes that is awesome.)

lucas-glover-golf-swing-7

Lucas Glover’s finish is what I like most about his swing.  See how straight his body is?  This isn’t just good for consistent golf, it’s also great for your back.

lucas-glover-golf-swing-8

Overall, I’d give Lucas Glover’s swing 8 out of 10.  Lucas didn’t win the U.S. Open with his swing, he also had some good luck with the weather and pairings.  Of course, Lucas has a really good short game and mentally “tougher” than the others.

Here’s Lucas Glover’s Golf Swing in Slow-motion video:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

The stuff you need to learn from Lucas Glover’s Swing:

1. Wide takeaway - Wide takeaway isn’t just for hitting the ball, it also let you swing more free as you can “feel” the centripetal force as you swing back.

If you want to learn to do a wide takeaway, simply put only your right hand on the club and try to swing back like you are holding a slingshot.  If you can feel that, apply it on your real swing.

2. Stable Impact - You want to learn to hit the golf ball without losing your balance.  Next time you are on the range, try to develop a stable impact position by “staying up” through impact.  You will almost feel like you are standing up at impact if you do this right.  In fact, you want to feel like you are standing up during your whole swing.

3. Great Finish – Great finish usually result in great balance and that you end up standing tall like Lucas Glover.  Next time you are at the range, finish your golf swing and stand “tall” afterwards and hold your finish for 3 seconds.  If you can do that, that means you have kept your balance through the swing.

More cool balancing exercises – Take a golf pencil, bite it with your mouth and try to hit full shots without losing your golf pencil.  If you can master this, your body will automatically learn to balance and swing better.

Well, that’s about it for today folks, I will try to have more golf swing analysis later this week so I hope you get better at golf!

Go practice now, don’t just sit there and read golf blogs.

Bubba Watson Driver Swing Analysis

Saturday, July 12th, 2008

Bubba Watson Driver Swing Analysis

Bubba Watson is probably one of the longest hitters on the PGA Tour today.  Let’s look at his unstable swing that makes the ball go far.

At takeaway, Bubba transfers his weight far into his left leg.  This might cause him to miss a lot of shots.

At the top, Bubba’s almost falling over his left side.  Not good, but maybe the only thing it’s good for is distance.

On half-way down, Bubba’s head is still over his left foot or even slightly outside.  This is asking for disaster in pro golf.

At impact, Bubba looks like his swinging a sledge hammer, not a golf club.

After impact, Bubba is completely out of balance with his right foot sliding forward and hit left foot coming out.

This is probably not the swing that’s going to win whole lotta PGA tournaments unless Bubba learns to control his swing.  It’s not about the distance, it’s about scoring low every week.

If he did however change his swing to be in more control, he should be able to win a lot of tournaments.

Here’s Bubba Watson’s Ugly Driver Swing Sequence in Slow-mo:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Will McKenzie Driver Stack and Tilt Swing Analysis

Friday, July 11th, 2008

Will McKenzie is leading today over at John Deere Classic.  He shot 65 yesterday and 64 today.

Let’s look at his stack and tilt swing to see what makes him “tick”.

First of all, I’d like to say that Will has a really simple looking swing, it looks really good.

At address, you will notice that Will stays real “balanced” in the center, not tilting his shoulders much.  This is great way to swing.  Now, pay attention to the triangle formed by his arms and the club.

At takeaway, Will breaks his wrists slightly early but that’s not a problem as his triangle looks great.

At top of Will’s swing, Will looks really good, with little or no backswing weight transfer (his head stays in the same position as at address) and he has a really great “width”.  Notice how far above his head the hands are.

At half-way down, Will looks pretty good again although his right foot could be more relaxed.

At impact, will really gets his hands ahead of the ball but stays in perfect balance.

After impact, WIll’s follow-through is a mirror-image of his takeaway.  Again, great stuff.

Will’s finish is probably one of the best I’ve seen.  His standing almost perfectly vertical as you can see the line formed by his legs and upper body.  This is really good for playing golf when you get older and also helps your back.  (no straining your back when you finish like this)

Overall, I am really impressed at Will’s swing because of his rhythm and simplicity.  He makes it look “easy”.

I wouldn’t be surprised if he won this weekend, good luck Will.

Here’s Will McKenzie’s Driver swing in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Here’s Will McKenzie’s Driver swing in action from the back, it looks really good:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Jeff Overton Iron Swing Analysis

Monday, July 7th, 2008

Jeff Overton Iron Swing Analysis

Jeff Overton is one of those young guys on the PGA Tour who haven’t really proved themselves yet but have a lot of potential to do so.  Let’s look at the young star’s swing.

At address, Jeff sets up with his hands way ahead of his ball, an unusual setup.

At takeaway, Jeff breaks down his wrists early.

At top of his swing, note the position of his head.

Look at how far his head has dipped at half-way down.

At impact, notice that his head has dipped probably around 5-8 inches from his backswing.

After impact, Jeff does pretty good in extending the club.

At finish, Jeff’s left foot AND right foot has slided about 10 degrees to his left, sign that he needs to work on his footing.

Jeff Overton’s swing may not be the worst on tour but he really needs to work on not dipping as much and his footing.

Clearly, this isn’t a swing that can win majors or any PGA tour tournament unless his short game and putting is just like a miracle.

With some swing changes, this young man could really win some tournaments though.  It’s hard to believe even that he made it to the PGA Tour with this swing.

Here’s Jeff Overton’s swing in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Anthony Kim Driver Swing Analysis

Saturday, July 5th, 2008

Okay, today, we will do a “real” swing analysis of Anthony Kim’s swing. (unlike my older post on Anthony Kim’s swing video only)

Now, this young man gas a great swing and might start taking over PGA Tour with multiple wins.

At takeaway, Anthony is a little too much inside. (This is what the “traditional” golf teachers teach you. But don’t be fooled, the follow-through will prove that Anothony “came back” to the right plane to hit the ball, which almost every pro tour golfer does)

At half-way, Anthony is still way too inside but that’s okay as it will get from here on.

At top os his swing, you can see how well his hands, and clubface are in-plane. (The four diagonal lines represent the true plane of the golf swing)

At downswing, Anthony is slightly inside the plane, which is perfectly acceptable.

At impact, notice how his left arms is straight and right arms slightly bent like at address.

Now what impresses me about Anthony Kim’s swing is not his takeaway or backswing but right after impact.

As you can see, his clubface is almost dead-on or slightly outside the plane. This movement is actually the best move. (Players like Ben Hogan and Tiger Woods do this)

After impact, it gets even better as Anthony’s club stays on-plane.

At finish, check out how controlled his right foot is, it’s barely coming up.

What can you learn from Anthony Kim’s swing?

There are many ways to swing the club. Try to focus on getting that club on-plane at the top of your swing and after impact.

Even most tour pros have completely different opinions on how to swing on-plane but their after impact positions will be the same.

Here’s Anthony Kim’s swing in slow-motion (SWING VISION):

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Kenny Perry Iron Swing Analysis

Monday, June 30th, 2008

Yey, Kenny Perry wins this week’s Buick Open. Although not an avid fan of Kenny Perry, he certainly has proven himself by winning twice this year and also coming up runner-up once.

So, why is Kenny winning at 48 years old while all the youngsters in the 20s are struggling?

Well, golf is a game of smart thinking more than it’s about power and accuracy.

Kenny Perry does not have a perfect swing by any means but he does very consistent with his swing, mostly controlled by arms and hands.

At top of Kenny’s swing, you can note that his left shoulder comes over his right leg.

On the downswing, Kenny keeps his lower body quiet while letting the hands and arms do most of the work.

At impact, you can see clearly that Kenny really “swings” the club rather than hit the ball.

After impact, notice how Kenny’s right foot is implanted on the ground. Kenny really tries to swing nice and smooth, which is what is required for a hands and arms swing.

If Kenny swung any harder, all his balls would hook or go left.

What to learn from Kenny’s iron swing?

You need to note that in order to be accurate with your irons, you need to let the club do most of the work for you. Of course, you can give the ball a real smack in the back but you probably won’t be consisten that way.

Here’s Kenny Perry’s iron swing in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Jesper Parnevik Driver Swing Analysis

Monday, June 23rd, 2008

Jesper Parnevik has always been my Swedish golf hero(outside Annika Sorenstam that is). I remember seeing him for the first time on TV about 15 or so years ago and I still remember how he had his cap backwards and advertisers actually started putting their logo inside-out just for Jesper.

Let’s look at his swing:

At takeaway, Jesper is slightly inside the plane but no big deal here, looks great.

At half-way, Jesper is still on-plane, maybe slightly flat but it works.

At the top of his swing, Jesper is pretty much on plane, maybe slightly upright. His clubface is slightly shut, meaning it’s a little closed, meaning it’s pointing a little too much at the sky. This isn’t problem for Jesper as most pro tours do have it slightly shut for a nice draw.

At half-way down, you can see how well Jesper fits his hands and club onto the red plane. Most pro tours are great at this.

At impact, Jesper is great. Maybe his right arm could be extended a little but that’s because his head dipped about 3-4 inches from address. (If you take a look at the location of the bunker at address and here, you will see.)

The dip usually isn’t a big problem for most pro tours as it’s a natural thing. You might want to watch out though if you are dipping more than 4 inches. (My recommendation is to try around 1-2 inches of dip at most. To lessen dipping on your swing, swing effortlessly and also feel like you are standing up tall during your whole swing)

Jesper looks great after impact. Take a look at the triangle formed by his arms, shoulders, and hands. This is a characteristic a lot of the good ball strikers on tour all have. (Sorta like the mirror image position of the backswing.)

At finish, Jesper is in perfect balance, enjoying his perfect tee shot. Take a look at his right foot and how the tip of the foot is straight down. You want this at the finish for a perfect balance in your swing.

What to take from Jesper’s swing?

Well, golf is partly or mostly about balance. If you can be in balance at address, backswing, and the finish, you are 10 times more likely to hit the ball straighter and farther than if you are not in balance.

Next time you go out on the range, see if you can stay in balance during your swing and also hold your finish for 3 seconds. If you can do this on every shot, you must be hitting the ball pretty good, at least solid even if you spray it.

Here’s Jesper Parnevik’s Driving Swing in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

How to Hit the Dreaded 30 Yard Pitch Shot!

Friday, June 6th, 2008

The dreaded 30 yard pitch shot? Does this remind of you when you are on the course and you have an easy 30 yard shot from the fairway to the pin and you either “thin” it or “chunk” it?

Well, the 30 yard pitch shot is nothing more than a mini-version of your swing but there are some key points you might want to take in so you don’t thin it or chunk it.

(more…)

Mickey Wright Driver Golf Swing Analysis!

Thursday, June 5th, 2008

The funny thing about golf is that people talk about this and that new golf swing concept when in fact, it isn’t new at all.

(more…)

Today’s Swing Thoughts

Saturday, May 31st, 2008

Well, today I hit the ball great again and here’s my swing thought for the day:

1. Watch your weight shift during your backswing.  Make sure it doesn’t transfer more than 75% to your right foot.  My fault has been that I’d transfer more than 75%, thus causing me to sway.

2. On the downswing and follow-through, make sure to keep your head down.  This caused to fix 90% of my problems simply by keeping my head down.

3. Rhythm,rhythm, and rhythm.  Without rhythm, you are not swinging the golf club.  You need rhythm for all kinds of shots including short pitch shots and putting.

Well, that was about it and I did hit lots of great short pitch shot from about 10-30 yards.

Here’s some key thoughts on hitting great 10-30 yard short pitch shots.

1. Rhythm – try to focus on your rhythm, this will automatically help you hit that pitch shot nice and crip while accelerating through the ball.

2. Soft hands – Keep your hands ultra-soft, like noodles hanging, and make sure to keep them soft during the whole pitch shot.  Let your hands be wristy, don’t be stiff.  Great soft pitch shot come from soft hands and wrist action.

3. Try to hit the pitch shot so you can hear the crisp sound of the ball wacking the middle of the clubface.

4. Setup to the ball square or slightly open.  A lot of players open the stance too much, that will only help you cut across the ball and not as much pure backspin, which is what you want.

5. A small pitch shot is basically a miniture version of your full swing.  Feel, feel, and practice.

You can also try opening up your clubface 30 degrees but with a square stance.  This will put a lot of spin on the ball and give you that “hop and drop” effect even on really short shots.

Advanced Golf: For even more “hop and drop” effect, you can even feel like “trapping” the ball with your upper body on the downswing.  Doing this makes the pitch shot go slightly lower yet spin like crazy if you catch it super clean.

Now, these are for pitch shots from 10 to 50 yards.  Those are the best shots to practice.

Find a quiet empty green with just 3 Titleist Pro-V golf balls and move around every 3 balls.  Don’t bang 100 balls from the same spot, that is the worst way to practice small pitch shots.

Make sure to pratice with the ball you play with.  3 balls is enough.