Posts Tagged ‘pga tour tournament’

Golf DIY – How To Mentally Play Well and Score Well by Practicing Mentally!

Wednesday, June 24th, 2009

Anyone who has played golf for at least a year would realize that golf is 90% mental and 10% skill.

This is so more true as you get to a higher level such as scratch golf or pro golf.

The truth is, most PGA Tour players today can hit the ball as good as the guy next to him.

The real difference between top players who win tournaments and the guy who finishes last in a PGA Tour tournament may be blamed purely on mental state of the player.

I have mentioned in many of my previous tournament analysis that the player who is tougher nearing down the last 3 holes of the tournament usually wins the golf tournament.

That is completely true, most golf tournaments are decided on the last 3 holes.

For example, even the 2009 U.S. Open came down to the last 3 holes where Lucas Glover made a birdie on the 16th hole and parred out the rest while everyone else had at least 1 bogey. I am sure it could have been different if Ricky Barnes, Phil Mickelson, or David Duval birdied couple of those last holes.

Or even take a look at the miraculous win by Tiger Woods at 2008 U.S. Open, where Tiger had to birdie the last hole to force a playoff with Rocco Mediate. Tiger dumps his drive in the rough, then procceeds to hit his 2nd shot to the rough, and barely makes it to the green. But Tiger’s mental toughness has helped him make that 10 footer downhiller under intense moments of pressure, not just his skill or luck.

So, how to get this mental toughness?

Well, first you need to be in that state of pressure, if you have nothing to go for, there’s no pressure.

You can easily practice this type of pressure while you practice on the driving range or play a round at your favorite golf course.

What me and my pro golfer friends like to do is actually bet money and play a skins game during the course of the round. This “pressure”, even if it’s a dollar a hole, will make you focus more on “playing” the game and also let you “practice” pressure golf.

When I am at the driving range, I like to play games with myself. I will challenge myself to hit 10 of 10 shots to within 100 yards. (You can also read about developing your bread-and-butter shot by signing up for my newsletter in the free E-book I provide.)

Another way to engage yourself in pressure golf at the driving range is to actually play a round of golf in your mind.

That’s right, I will imagine my favorite golf course and actually hit my drives, approach shots, and pitch shots. I make it so real that I actually go through my whole pre-shot routine, which is a must if you want to play great golf. (I will also do a blog post soon on how to develop and maintain a pre-shot routinne later this week.)

A lot of people don’t like to gamble on the golf course but gambling with your friends is actually one of the best ways to improve your game and practice “pressure” golf.

You don’t have to bet a lot of money, even pennies will do, just so long as there’s something on the line, mainly which boils down to your confidence, not really money itself.

So again, make sure you play for some money (or even house duties) the next time you play golf with your friends and family.

One of my favorite things to do was play skins game with all the seniors at my local club and take all their money, even with handicaps given for them. Now, that was a lot of fun because the seniors enjoyed playing with good young golfers like me, even if that was losing couple bucks every time.

Next time you go out on the range, don’t just mindlessly bang golf balls after another, practice “playing” on the practice range.

I hope these golf tips help you play better the next time you try to let your friends pay for your dinner and I will have to get back to getting my golf game up to par so I can try out for the PGA Tour next year.

Happy golfin’~

P.S. One of the keys to playing well under pressure is to simply enjoy golf and have fun. Can you remember how many times you played good and had fun?

Oops, another golfing secret spilled…

How to Get Your Kids Ready for Pro Golf!

Monday, June 22nd, 2009

Last time, I did a short post on how getting your baby/toddler/kids started early in golf has a lot to do with their success when they grow up to be an adult.

Well, that is true, you want to get your kids started in golf ASAP, even if your kids don’t end up playing golf the rest  of their lives, having the learned golf early in life will help them to enjoy and play golf as well as possible.

The other day, I hit a milestone in my life, I realized that I have actually got myself “ready” for the PGA Tour.

How?

Well, I found a way to make residual income from my blogging business.  Which is great since I can pretty much control my own time, meaning I will be hitting up the links any time I want.

Now, a lot of my pro golfer colleagues who decided to keep playing mini-tours have gone dry.  Basically, they didn’t win enough to pay for their expenses and living costs and ran out of money.

That’s right, I will tell you right now that the best insurance against failing in pro golf is money.  Of course, great players who at least win 1 PGA Tour tournament is going to have enough money to keep trying until they win their next one.  There’s a lot of those folks too except those players probably only make up a small fraction  of all the pro golfers in the world.

So what really happens to those pro golfers who run out of money?

Nothing, absolutely nothing.  Nothing happens to them because they run out of money and can’t play in tournaments anymore.  Maybe they will keep trying but most of them will end up starting life all over again with a job.

The most profound advice I can give your 12 year old or even 18 year old kid is that you need to learn to make money too with something other than golf.

Think of it as a side job or insurance  you can depend on.

I am not talking about a college degree here, that’s easy but I am actually talking about bringing in hard, cold cash without the use of golf clubs.

In the best possible scenario, your kid can get a golf scholarship to college, finish Top 10 in NCAA, and go straight to the PGA Tour with sponsorship from Nike.

LMAO, that certainly doesn’t happen unless you are handful of players in the world.  If your kids on this route and he/she’s that good, you can stop reading this post right now.

But if you are seriously passionate about your kid becoming a professional golfer, then read on.

Becoming a professional golfer on the PGA or LPGA Tour isn’t hard if you have the next 30 years to keep trying and trying.  The hard part is that most pro golfers run out of money while trying whether that be 1 year or 10 years.

Now, if your kid had enough money to keep going until he/she turns 50, I am 100% positive your kid will make it to the Tour, unless he/she simply sucks at golf and never improves. (or lazy)

That being said, a lot of great college golfers never end up on the PGA/LPGA Tour, simply because they get a job, get caught up with life, have kids, and their dream changes.

Don’t let that happen to your kids, let them learn other ways to fund their dreams.

I am not saying here that you should set up a trust fund for your kids so that they can keep trying out for the Tour until they reach 50.

What I am saying here is to teach your kids to catch fish.

Feed your kids fish and they will keep waiting for you to give them fish.

Teach your kids how to fish and they will probably find a way to the Tour.

I’ve seen hundreds of talented young golfers on the mini-tour.  Most of them will never make it mainly because they don’t have enough money to keep trying.

For example, if you are a real estate millionaire, you should teach your kids how to make millions of dollars on the side with real estate.  Even if your kids don’t make it to the Tour, at least they can take couple years off and make millions on real estate.

The greatest beauty of golf is that most pro golfers peak at mid 30s or even 40s.  One of the greatest golfers in history of golf, if not the greatest, Ben Hogan, didn’t start winning majors until he was past 30.

There’s always plenty time to play professional golf in one’s life, you simply need to have enough time and money to do it.

With that said, I am finally announcing my come-back in life to play pro golf again or at least keep trying every year for the PGA Tour.

If I didn’t keep trying to start my own business, this day would not have come.

While most of my colleagues are busy finding jobs after failing to make the PGA Tour in the last 2-5 years, I have finally got myself together to keep trying again.

My advice to you on raising the next PGA star, “Teach your kids how to make residual income whether that’s blogging, real-estate, or whatever.  Once your kids can learn to feed themselves without working at a corporate job 9 to 5, that’s when your kids will be able to keeping hitting those golf balls rest of their life and make it to the PGA/LPGA Tour some day”.

I’ve seen a handful of talent that go wasted, don’t let that happen to your kids.

Don’t take a chance that your kids will be the lucky ones that receive sponsorships out of college.

My last words?

I am that very kid who kept playing competitively until one day I ran out of money.  Of course, I had to learn all this advice through trial and error but eventually, I found a way to earn residual income and control my life.  The earlier you can do this, the longer you can play professional golf.

If your kid’s as passionate about golf as I am, he/she’s going to need this advice.  Think of it as “insurance” for your kids.  No matter what, your kids will be a fun life, playing more golf than the rest of the population.

Well, just something to think about.

Most start-ups these days don’t make it because they run out of money to keep going, not because their ideas suck.  Likewise, your pro-aspiring kids can make it to the Tour eventually, they simply need a way to finance their dreams for the next 30-40 years, not just 2-5 years.

Okay, I will stop here but now you know your job as a parent and how to get your kids to keep trying until they make it.

P.S. I know about a dozen great pro golfers who would have won dozen PGA Tour tournaments if they had money to keep going.  Money is the only thing holding them back.  If you have enough money to bet on every spot in roulette, you’d win at least once.  Likewise, if you have enough money to keep trying for the PGA Tour for the next 30 years, you will make it. :)

Next time, I will do a blog post on how to market your pro-golf career with a blog I think.  Something I didn’t do but could possibly build your fan base and enough money to keep your pro-golfing career going.

Jeff Overton Iron Swing Analysis

Monday, July 7th, 2008

Jeff Overton Iron Swing Analysis

Jeff Overton is one of those young guys on the PGA Tour who haven’t really proved themselves yet but have a lot of potential to do so.  Let’s look at the young star’s swing.

At address, Jeff sets up with his hands way ahead of his ball, an unusual setup.

At takeaway, Jeff breaks down his wrists early.

At top of his swing, note the position of his head.

Look at how far his head has dipped at half-way down.

At impact, notice that his head has dipped probably around 5-8 inches from his backswing.

After impact, Jeff does pretty good in extending the club.

At finish, Jeff’s left foot AND right foot has slided about 10 degrees to his left, sign that he needs to work on his footing.

Jeff Overton’s swing may not be the worst on tour but he really needs to work on not dipping as much and his footing.

Clearly, this isn’t a swing that can win majors or any PGA tour tournament unless his short game and putting is just like a miracle.

With some swing changes, this young man could really win some tournaments though.  It’s hard to believe even that he made it to the PGA Tour with this swing.

Here’s Jeff Overton’s swing in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Looking back at Ryuji Imada’s college golf!

Monday, May 19th, 2008

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Well, today I was going to do a swing analysis of yesterday’s AT&T PGA Tour winner, Ryuji Imada, but here’s a little look back into his college golf career.

Btw, Ryuji Imada won almost every AJGA tournament back when he was a junior and placed 2nd in the 1999 NCAA.  It’s amazing that it took him so long to win his 1st PGA Tour tournament.

My guess is that since he won one, he will keep winning a lot more of them, especially this year…