Posts Tagged ‘jack nicklaus’

Weekend Warriors – How to Hit the Ball More Consistently!

Sunday, August 23rd, 2009

Most of us don’t have the time that it takes to perfect a golf swing nor maintain it.  For those weekend warriors, here’s couple swing tips that have actually worked for me:

  • Don’t fight your swing, whether you hit a draw or fade on that day, just play that shot.
  • Keep your swing smooth but make sure your followthrough is longer than your backswing.  This makes sure you accelerate through the golf ball without over-swinging.  This is probably the best tip for keeping your ball flight consistent even if you hardly practice.
  • Keeping your ball flight consistent, whether that’s a slice or hook,  comes first.  If you can hit the ball with a consistent ball flight, you don’t have to hit the ball straight and still score good.  I’ve seen hundreds of scratch golfers who have bad swings but they have consistent ball flights.
  • Don’t ever try to “correct” your swing, just go with the flow and work with your flawed swing.  Again, consistency rules over straight shots.  Even pro golfers don’t try to hit the ball straight.  Jack Nicklaus and Fred Couple hit fades all through major championships, you should pick a side too.
  • Practice more short game and putting, that’s where your advantage is or even Tiger’s for that matter, not in the 300+ yard driver.  Although it’d be good to hit it 300+ yards off the tee, that’s the last thing that’s gonna help you score near par.

I’ve been playing golf for over 20+ years now and more I realize that perfecting your golf swing has more to do with scoring bad  than trying to work with what you already have.

Even me, I have less time to practice than before since I have to run my online publishing business.   I score better when I try to find ways to keep my swing more consistent by doing less.

Less is more, especially in golf.  No matter how many personal golf lessons you get, it’s probably worthless if you change your swing everytime you go out on the golf course.  Stop tinkering and start playing golf.

Here’s a simple exercise if you tend to end up in vicious cycle of trying to fix your swing.

1. Don’t practice on the range anymore.

2. Don’t try to fix your swing on the golf course.

3. Keep playing more golf and try to work on your golf strategy to fit your ball flight.

4. keep doing 1 to 3 until your ball flight is consistent and you have find a working golf course strategy.

5. If you must, fix your swing once every 3 months.

Happy golfing!

Jack Nicklaus Golf My Way!

Wednesday, July 9th, 2008

I remember reading the book, Golf My Way, by Jack Nicklaus over and over again when I was learning to play golf.  Jack has some really great insights into golf course strategy and fading the ball.  That’s probably the major reason he won so many majors, not his swing.

Anyways, Jack did make video of Golf My Way too, here’s an excerpt on Youtube.

Part I

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Part II

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You can get Golf My Way the Book at Amazon here

Videos

Golf My Way – Full Swing Video

Golf My Way – Control Shots Video

I remember my dad used to have Golf My Way videos.  I still have them and do recommend you watch them too if you haven’t yet.

Jack Nicklaus is still the best strategy golfer of all time.

Jim Furyk Driver Swing Analysis

Monday, July 7th, 2008

Jim Furyk has always been one of my golfing heroes due to the fact that he’s swing is probably the weirdest on the PGA Tour yet he is so successful.

Although Jim Furyk might breaks all rules of physics and textbook teaching, I will prove today that he does have one of the best after impact positions in golf.

At setup, Jim’s hands are pretty much “glued” to his thighs and he stands very very close to the ball.

On takeaway, Jim’s clubface is shut and a little inside the plane.

At half-way, Jim is actually on-plane with the hands but his club is very upright.

At the top of the swing, Jim is pretty much trying to get his hands as vertical as he can.  This is not a bad thing as even Jack Nicklaus tells you to do this at one point in his career.

Vertical swings have been great for hitting the ball very high.

Now the greatest part about Jim is that he re-routes his club back into perfect hitting position as seen here.

He’s actually slightly inside the plane, allowing a perfect setup for inside-out swing.

At impact, Jim must turn his hips, shoulders, head, and everything except the club in order to square the clubface.   Not the easiest way to swing but watch for the next action.

Check out how perfectly Jim’s club is on-plane.  This is something that almost every top golfer does regardless of how they swing the club back.

This is why Jim is on the PGA Tour.

Great finish, and another legendary swing that no one will ever be able to copy.

Here’s Jim Furyk’s driver in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Mission Hills Golf Course at Phuket!

Thursday, June 19th, 2008

Mission Hills Golf Course at Phuket!

There, I finally found a cool golf course to book a hotel and some rounds at Phuket, Thailand.

I will not be going anytime soon but still, it’s great to map out your future vacation about a year beforehand.

If you are gonna stay in Phuket, Thailand and you are a golf fanatic, you might want to consider booking couple days here at Phuket Mission Hills Golf Resort and play a couple rounds on a golf course designed by Jack Nicklaus.

Situated on the north-east edge of Phuket, the Mission Hills Resort does look promising if Jack Nicklaus is behind it.

via onearthtravel

Moe Norman Swing Analysis – What does Moe Norman have in common with Tiger Woods?

Monday, June 9th, 2008

If you have been a golf fanatic like me for almost 20 years, you will know that one of the best ball strikers next to Ben Hogan in history of golf was Moe Norman.

Moe Norman is a Canadian golfer who didn’t play as many US tour events as he should have but he’s regarded as the best ball striker by many people.

Another great Canadian golfer is George Knudson, a golfer Jack Nicklaus said that had one of the best swings in golf.

Anyways, let’s look at the one-swing plane Moe Norman teaches and I can tell you that it’s not that much different from Tiger’s swing except the setup.

As you can see, Moe Norman “says” he teaches 1-plane swing, but he actually is a little bit under the plane. In that regards, Tiger’s swing is more on-plane.

Mind you, Moe Norman is a great golfer and teacher but do as he says not as he does. (His swing is off-plane here as evidenced on the screenshot)

At the top of Moe Norman’s swing, you can see that Moe is perfectly on-plane. Now, Tiger swing way past 3/4 so we can compare Tiger’s 3/4 position to Moe Norman.

As you can see, there’s no difference between the two great golfers. Their start setup might be different but MOST pro tour players do end up in the similar top of backswing positions, impact, and followthrough.

Now, half-way downswing, you can see that both players are slightly under the plane, both of which are fine for crisp inside-out strike.

There are a lot of “myths” out on the internet that Moe Norman’s swing is a unique swing. The setup is unique but the other parts are the same.

So which setup is better for striking the ball?

I think that either setup is great. Moe Norman prefers to setup so his arms and hands are on-plane at address. This isn’t something natural for most golfers and I like to take the regular “hang the arms” style setup.

The fact is that at impact, your arms and hands straighten out anyways, so I don’t feel the need to setup like that unless you are a hardcore fan of Moe Norman.

At impact, notice that both golfers are pretty much identical except Tiger’s taller so he seems to be coming at a more vertical angle but in reality, both players are achieving the same thing.

The point of this post?

Well, there are a lot of instructors out there that “claim” they can teach you the 1-swing plane.

Well, folks, the truth is that the 1-swing plane is something that Tiger and many other tour players implement.

The only thing Moe Norman does differently is his setup and if you want to learn that and pay some golf schmuck couple hundred bucks, go ahead but golf in essence is same whether you learn Moe’s method or anyone elses.

My 1-swing Plane Theory

My 1-swing plane theory is not something I learned from another teacher. It has come from analyzing and studying the best players in slow-motion, at tournaments, and playing high-pressure tournaments myself to see what worked or not.

If you look at any of my video swing analysis, you will see the plane line I set from the ball through the middle of right shoulder socket. This is the plane that Tiger Woods and Moe Norman uses. It’s a great plane to follow because it allows the golfer to get back to the golf ball from the top of the backswing with minimal manipulation such as “arms dropping” and etc…etc…

I’ve also noticed that more and more players are adopting the 1-swing plane on tour. It’s simply a better way to hit the ball and puts less stress on your back when done right.

So how to achieve this 1-swing plane?

Well, I can’t tell you all the secrets but yes, I am working on an e-book that will show you some simple drills that help you achieve this goal.

Here’s Moe Norman’s swing in action for your reference but don’t go buy some stupid instructions on the web:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Kenny Perry Swing Analysis

Sunday, June 1st, 2008

Kenny Perry Swing Analysis

Congratulations to Kenny Perry today, who won the Memorial Tournament for the 3 times in his life, matching Tiger Woods’ record, the only other person to have won 3 times.

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Matt Kuchar Swing Analysis

Sunday, June 1st, 2008

Matt Kuchar Swing Analysis

Here’s a swing analysis of Matt Kuchar, winner of the 1997 US Amateur.

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Retief Goosen Swing Analysis

Friday, May 23rd, 2008

Retieft Goosen has one of the best rhythms in golf.  Here’s Retief at setup.

At backswing, Retief is right on-plane.  Now, there’s 2 types of planes that 99% of tour pros use.

One plane is the plane formed by the ball to the middle of the shoulder sockets (the top red line) and the other one is the plane formed by the ball to the belly. (the bottom red line)

Retief here uses the 2nd type of plane, which is what David Leadbetter promotes whereas Butch Harmon does the other.

The impotant thing is to keep your plane within the two different types of plane.  Anything higher or lower will make your swing a lot harder to keep up and cause back problems.

Jack Nicklaus probably breaks this swing plane rule but that explains why he needed a ceramic hip replacement.

At the top of the backswing, Retief has a beautiful triangle.  His club is pointing slight to the right of parallel meaning he will probably hit from inside-out and a slight draw.   This can become a problem for Retief if his club starts pointing more right and cause blocks to the right under pressure.

At downswing, Retief is actually a little too “steep”.  This can again cause blocks to the right.  But Retief manages to get back on plane right before impact:

As you can see, Retief is coming in a little too much inside-out.  His shoulders are still inside-out.  He might hit a good 15 yard draw on this drive but again, this type of too much inside-out action will cause blocks to the right.

However, it’s always better to error on the inside-out plane than outside-in plane since you do hit the ball more accurately this way.

After impact, Retieft shows he hit the ball perfectly as his club and right arm are in plane with the ball.

This is the secret.  No matter how bad your backswing is, if you can end up in this position, you will hit the ball very very good like Retief Goosen.

Here’s the video:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Swing Analysis of Jim Furyk – A Perfect Swing

Thursday, May 15th, 2008

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Here’s Jim Furyk’s perfect golf swing.

Why do I say it’s “perfect”?

If you look at Jim Furyk’s swing very carefully, you can note the following things:

1. Jim’s swing at the top of the backswing looks very unorthodox but it is very very similar to how Jack Nicklaus swung during his prime. Jack Nicklaus always advised golfers to swing in a very upright fashion, and he did say that this is great for hitting the ball high with long irons.

Mind you, Jack Nicklaus was the greatest “fade” long iron player in the history of golf and he did hit them very very high.

Now, this “upright” backswing can be seen in players like Jim Furyk, Jack Nicklaus, and John Daly from what I can remember.

This “upright” backswing can work for you or it may not. Depending on how rest of your swing is like and what your physique is like, this maybe be a good factor in your perfect swing.

2. At follow through, both of Jim’s arms are straight out, completely extended, a trait that almost all great players in the world carry including Tiger Woods, Jack Nicklaus, Ben Hogan, etc…etc…

Now, it may look to the naked eye that Jim Furyk’s swing may look unorthodox as some say. But remember in golf, there is no such thing as “orthodox”. All golf swing concepts are made by people and not even single one can be named perfect.

Even Ben Hogan or Jack Nicklaus once said, “I hit maybe couple perfect shots in a period of year”.

The important thing to realize is that everyone has their own “perfect” swing whether others think that looks unorthodox or not.

It’s very important for you to find your own swing, a swing that can work for you whether you are playing a round for fun or you are playing for $100 per hole skins.

In this case, Jim does have a “perfect” swing which I have admired over the years and amazed at how low he can go under tournament pressure.

Next time you see a golfer with a bad swing and a bad grip on the course, be aware, he maybe the best golfer you ever played with.