Posts Tagged ‘iron shots’

How to Control Distance and Trajectory of Your Iron Shots!

Saturday, October 24th, 2009

This one is pretty simple but learning how to control distance of your iron shots is one of the most effective ways to control your distance and also trajectory.

For example, you have 150 yards to the pin from the fairway.  If you hit your 7-iron 150 yards with a full swing, that’d be good to use on a sunny day with absolutely no wind.

On the other hand, let’s say there’s a heavy 20MPH wind going against you on the 150 yard shot.  You could possibly hit another club and hit your 6-iron with a full shot or hit the 6 or 5-iron with a half swing, which will result in lower trajectory  and your shot won’t be affected by the wind.

Most of the time, I choose to go with the latter, choosing a much lower-numbered club and hit it with either 3/4 or 1/2 swing.  This is usually called a “knock-down” shot and it’s imperative that you learn how to do this if you want too be a good all-around player.

For example, if you play in super-windy areas like Texas, you don’t have a choice but to deal with 30+MPH winds on a daily basis.  You need to hit the ball lower but hitting a full shot won’t help you do that.

Although you could put the ball back in your stance and make a full swing at it, because you are still swinging “full”, the amount of backspin put on the ball will be too much and affected too much by the wind.

So, you need to learn to control the distance and trajectory of your iron shots.

How to do this?

Very simple actually, just take a shorter backswing.  But you will need to practice often on the range in order to “control” precisely.

Next time you go out on the range, don’t simply bang full-swings, see if you can hit the same target with different clubs, with different length of backswings.

If you have not tried doing this before, I assure you, you will won’t be too accurate, so practice makes perfect.

For example, when I go to the range, I will hit to a 150 yard target with my 8-iron. (with a full swing)  Then, I will take a 7-iron and also hit it 150 yards but with shorter backswing, which results in lower trajectory.  I will also take a 6-iron and take even short backswing.  Usually, I go about up to 3 clubs down before I move on to my next target.

This is not only great practice for your overall “feel” for distance and trajectory, now you potentially made new arsenal of shots in your golf bag.  Instead of just having 1 full shot from each club, you potentially now have multiple uses with each club.

Having more weapons in your golf bag means more ways you can attack the pin on the golf course.   Also, let’s say you have an approach shot with a tree hanging over about 30 yards out, perhaps this isn’t even a challenge to you because you have a shot in your bag with the right distance and trajectory to hit it under the tree and still get to the green.

Another great use for length of your backswing is as a swing thought.  Instead of filling your mind with too many things, simply think of the “length” of you backswing when hitting a golf ball on the course.  This will allow you to really be able to focus on one thing, that of controlling your distance.

The rest of the swing should be pretty easy and automatic if you have been practicing your fundamentals and needless to say, the less you think about your golf swing on the course, the better you play.

Well, keep practicing different lengths and trajectories by simply limiting how far you swing back.

Happy golfin!

Recommended Irons of the Week – Titleist Z Blend Forged Irons!

Thursday, October 9th, 2008

I personally use Titleist irons, specifically the 690MB forged irons which they don’t sell anymore but the new Titleist Z Blend forged irons are probably the new, equivalent of those.

I could probably tell you a lot of things about the features but let’s just say this is the recommended club for any low-handicapper to scratch players as it’s forgiving while the forged metal gives you more control over your ball flight.

Another very important thing 99% of golfers forget is the length, lie and loft of the irons.  You need to get every iron set you get “fitted” correctly.  FYI, my length is 1″ over standard, and lie is 2 degrees upright, and I have all my irons delofted about 1/2 a club since I tend to hit my iron shots quite high.

Choosing your set of golf clubs is important but without proper adjustments, you will hit the ball consistently to the left or right plus the fact that if your lie is off, you will hit the ball fat or thin even if you hit it perfect.

Titleist Z•B Forged irons are high performance, blended cavity-to-muscle back forged irons with traditional feel, superior looks and shot control for the highly skilled player.

The Z•B Forged irons blended set features cavity back long irons for playability and partial cavity mid irons blending to muscle back short irons for shot control. The contemporary Z back design precisely distributes weight from the heel into the toe, locating the center of gravity in the center of the face for solid feel.

Check out these Irons though, they look really nice.

J. B. Holmes Iron Swing Analysis

Monday, June 2nd, 2008

J. B. Holmes Iron Swing Analysis

J. B. Holmes is another player who recently appeared on the PGA Tour with a power swing.

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Swing Analysis of John Daly!

Thursday, May 15th, 2008

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

(Driver)

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

(Iron Shots)

John Daly has been one of my favorite golfers of all time. Although he may do outrageous things like getting too drunk, that’s not my concern and his still my hero for being one of the most unique golfers in history.

What most people to realize is that John Daly does not “Grip and Rip”, he actually has one of the best rhythms out of all the pro golfers. The “Grip and Rip” really refers to really going up to the ball and emptying his mind.

Even if you look at his driver swings carefully, you will realize how great his overall swing rhythm is. It’s probably as almost as good as Freddy Couples, but it’s hard to see due to his long backswing.

I even read John’s Grip and Rip It, it’s a great book in which he discusses the details of how he plays golf.

What to learn from John Daly?

Well, he does use a “trigger” type grip in which his right index finger is gripping the club like holding a gun trigger. Btw, . Greg Norman use to touch his index finger with his thumb. (I think he still does…)

Both these methods are trivial to the onlooker but they do great job of keeping your right hand out of your swing. You can experiment and see if it works for you as I have used it before with good success as I tend to use my right hand too much too.

Junger Woods Golf Psychology – Golf is not a game of Perfect!

Monday, May 12th, 2008

Golf is not a game of perfect, and this is a fact. Even all the championship winners, they have so many swing flaws. It’s a great thing they don’t tell you and Tiger is probably being more honest than most.

There’s even a great golf psychology book named, “Golf is not a game of Perfect”.

Now, the correct mind set on the golf course to play your best is to accept the fact that you are not perfect golfer and you do not have a perfect swing

No one in the world actually has a perfect swing, because it doesn’t exist!  Tiger Woods will be first to tell you that.

If you cannot get through this, you will have a tough time dealing with your results.

So what are you telling me, to think negative?

No, that’s not what I am telling you.  The best way to play golf is to be positive and to “visualize” all your shots going in the hole.

But, remember it’s what you do with what happens to you, NOT what happens to you.

So before your next round, tell yourself your “realistic” limits at the first tee and think through your course strategy for the day.

Let’s say at the practice range, you keep hitting your irons 50 yards to the left with a big bad hook.

Now, you can fight this big bad hook throughout your round OR you can simply use that as your advantage and start planning your course strategy to fit that.

So do I am 50 yards right on all my iron shots?

Hell yes, that’s what I am telling you to do.  Make best of what you have that day, you don’t need to be perfect.

I’ve had those rounds when I’ve shot under par when all my iron shots were going 50 yards left.   Now, if I had tried to correct my swing to hit it straight, I’d probably shot over 80 that day AND screwed up  my mindset for future golf rounds.

Now if this tip help you break 80 next time you go out there, don’t forget to subscribe to this blog and expect more fun psychology and course strategy lessons straight from my gut.