Posts Tagged ‘great golf’

How to Swing Better by Not Being Perfect!

Wednesday, August 19th, 2009

Sometimes, perfection can be the root of all evil things in a golf swing.  A lot of times when I was playing competitively on a daily basis, I would try to perfect my golf swing by banging 10 buckets of balls.  I would have probably done better if I just relaxed more and focused more on my short game and putting.

Golf is a game that requires great mental focus, it’s a not a game where the best golf swing mechanics win tournaments.  Rather, golfers with ability to turn the golf course into their friend wins as evidenced by Y.E. Yang’s win over Tiger last weekend.

That said, I hit balls for the first time in about 3 months yesterday and boy, I hit the ball really, really good.

Here’s something I tried to do yesterday:

  • I tried to not be perfect, simply relax my hands and let my body do the work.
  • My swing though consisted of “keep it smooth” like Fred Couples.
  • Worked on specific shots that would help me on the golf course like fading the ball (which is my strength) and odd shots that could get me out of trouble.

In all, yesterday’s practice at the driving range might have helped me whole lot more than me simply banging a lot of balls mindlessly one after another.

The key to great golf is keeping your golf swing consistent.   The only way an average golfer who rarely practices to keep their golf swing consistent is to keep their swing thoughts simple.

Golf has so many parts to master but unless you are a professional golfer with all the time in the world, you are not going to master it.

Forget “fixing” your swing and try simply “scoring” with your current golf swing.  Whatever your bad shots are, a nasty hook or banana slice, you can still “score” well by adjusting to your weaknesses and using them as strengths.

I’ve seen it a gazillion times where a golfer with a really weird swing will win over a golfer who has a perfect swing.  Most of the time, the golfer with a really weird swing has an incredible short game and a knack for putting since he/she is hitting the ball all over the place.  The golfer with perfect swing usually never performs under pressure because he/she simply does not know how to deal with trouble under pressure.

Anyways, I will be heading over to the course more often before this summer ends and looks like they got the tent set up at Harding Park for the President’s Cup 2009 this year. (I have an incredible view of the 12th hole at Harding Park from my 12th floor apartment!)

Vijay Singh Driver DL Swing Analysis

Friday, June 6th, 2008

Vijay Singh Driver DL Swing Analysis

Vijay Singh probably practices more than Tiger and that’s more than enough reason why Vijay has won so many tournaments.

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Tom Lehman Driver Swing Analysis

Monday, June 2nd, 2008

Tom Lehman Driver Swing Analysis

Tom Lehman is another player who “dips”, sorta like Kenny Perry. He is another proof on the tour that you do not need a perfect swing to play great golf.

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Kenny Perry Swing Analysis

Sunday, June 1st, 2008

Kenny Perry Swing Analysis

Congratulations to Kenny Perry today, who won the Memorial Tournament for the 3 times in his life, matching Tiger Woods’ record, the only other person to have won 3 times.

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K. J. Choi Swing Analysis!

Friday, May 23rd, 2008

Here’s swing analysis of K. J. Choi, a very good Korean golfer on the PGA Tour.

Here’s his takeaway, Choi breaks his wrists early but the important part is how well he kept his triangle. (the triangle formed by his arms and shoulder)

On his 3/4 backswing, you can see that KJ has fully cocked his wrists and notice how steady his lower body is. That might be secret to his consistency.

At the top of Choi’s swing, you can see a very good lower body balance and he does not overswing, stopping slight before the club reaches parallel point to the surface.  What I like most about his backswing is it looks so stable as if he’s ready to give a nice knock out punch.

Balance is the key on the backswing.  You should be able to be in this position in perfect balance.

On his downswing, Choi dips his head a little too much, which is explanation why he took such a big divot on this 6-iron shot.   Other than that, he does transfer weight well to his left feet and also maintains a very good 90 degree angle between his arms and the club, a must for any A-class golfer.

What you should learn from this position is Choi’s lower body transfer, this is where all his power comes from, the rotation and the weight transfer.

At impact, watch how straight his left arm and the club are together.  This guarantees you to hit the ball very very straight, although KJ is currently working on the power fade.  You will see this position on any pro golfer who wins a lot of tournaments.

Finally, but not least, check out how well KJ extends both of his arms after the ball is hit.  This is another key factor in a good swing.  (Check out the triangle, isn’t it beautiful?  Great golf swings always have triangles everywhere)

Now here’s a video of it in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Junger Woods Golf Psychology – Golf is not a game of Perfect!

Monday, May 12th, 2008

Golf is not a game of perfect, and this is a fact. Even all the championship winners, they have so many swing flaws. It’s a great thing they don’t tell you and Tiger is probably being more honest than most.

There’s even a great golf psychology book named, “Golf is not a game of Perfect”.

Now, the correct mind set on the golf course to play your best is to accept the fact that you are not perfect golfer and you do not have a perfect swing

No one in the world actually has a perfect swing, because it doesn’t exist!  Tiger Woods will be first to tell you that.

If you cannot get through this, you will have a tough time dealing with your results.

So what are you telling me, to think negative?

No, that’s not what I am telling you.  The best way to play golf is to be positive and to “visualize” all your shots going in the hole.

But, remember it’s what you do with what happens to you, NOT what happens to you.

So before your next round, tell yourself your “realistic” limits at the first tee and think through your course strategy for the day.

Let’s say at the practice range, you keep hitting your irons 50 yards to the left with a big bad hook.

Now, you can fight this big bad hook throughout your round OR you can simply use that as your advantage and start planning your course strategy to fit that.

So do I am 50 yards right on all my iron shots?

Hell yes, that’s what I am telling you to do.  Make best of what you have that day, you don’t need to be perfect.

I’ve had those rounds when I’ve shot under par when all my iron shots were going 50 yards left.   Now, if I had tried to correct my swing to hit it straight, I’d probably shot over 80 that day AND screwed up  my mindset for future golf rounds.

Now if this tip help you break 80 next time you go out there, don’t forget to subscribe to this blog and expect more fun psychology and course strategy lessons straight from my gut.