Posts Tagged ‘golf swing’

Reverse Engineering Your Golf Swing!

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011

Today I tried something weird, different, or whatever it was, it was really good.

For those of you who follow Ben Hogan’s transition, you know how his weight transfers well to his left while he has a perfect 90 degrees (or more) formed between his arms and the clubhead.

Well, try to get into that position then instead of swinging through do the exact opposite, just turn your body back to the right.

There you go, there’s your perfect backswing.

Just sayin’, sometimes if you can’t make it happen, reverse engineer it.

The Importance of Elbows in a Golf Swing!

Sunday, February 13th, 2011

Today, while hitting about 300 balls at the range, I began to realize that my elbows were a large part of the golf swing.

For some reason I can’t explain, I started hitting the ball really great when I felt like my elbows were in sync.

Well after tinkering a bit, I came to an answer, the elbows play a big part in your golf swing. Even Ben Hogan was once quoted saying that he used his elbows as part of his swing thought. (By the way, that swing thought was imagining a dot on both elbows and making it point up at the sky on both backswing and followthrough, you can read about that in the book, The Man Behind Mystique, perhaps the best book with a ton of still photographs of Hogan. I used to read it like everyday when I was in high school.)

What do the elbows do?

Actually they don’t do much, it’s not what you do with them but how elbows act in relation to rest of your golf swing.

In layman’s terms, you want to keep the elbows the focus of your golf swing. When your elbows are in sync, you move your body in sync. When your elbows are in sync, you can turn through the golf ball without any manipulation in your hands.

So how to do this?

After a bit of practice, I found that the “length” between your elbows must be constant throughout your golf swing.

Try it next time you are on the range, try to keep the length between your elbows constant. And feel like there’s a string attached between your elbows and keep them taut the same.

After you get the feel for your elbows being in sync, you don’t want to think about it. What I do is at address, make sure to feel the elbows together and parallel to my target. Once I get that feeling at address, my body instinctively try to keep my elbows in sync throughout my swing.

This motion of keeping elbows in sync has done some wonders for my golf game, especially my driver because it makes you swing in the correct swing path.

Well, another great day for my golf game. I will be heading over to South Korea a bit next week (not for golf) but will be back soon!

P.S. A great way to really understand what’s going on here is to actually open up your latest cover of Golf Digest and see some still photographs of a PGA golf pro and watch their elbows, you will see what I mean.

Tips for Improving the Follow Through of Your Golf Swing!

Friday, May 14th, 2010

(This was my follow through couple years back, one of the best ways to improve your follow through is to imagine the swing plane (as I have drawn the yellow line, and try swinging your body in sync with it.)

Today, I was at the range and had one of those “ah ha” moments.  Because I haven’t really played much golf up until recently around end of last year, I had failed to follow through correctly.

But, today I figured it out and got my swing back.

Here’s what I realized and some tips for improving your golf swing’s follow through.

Like I was telling you the other day you want to use images as swing thoughts, I want you to do the same except “vision” your hands, arms, and body following through toward your target.

When you do this correctly, your body should automatically turn to your left side and come up.  If your body doesn’t come up, that means you are probably not following through correctly.

After the follow through, you should arrive at a nice finish with most of your weight on the left foot for a full swing.

Also, one more thing, you want to feel “free” while doing this.  When you really free yourself of any tension during the follow-through, you will feel like you are actually swinging in an imaginary track formed by your swing plane.  This is because you are swinging correctly, with your body, and you are feeling the centripetal force pushing your arms, hands, and the golf club outwards towards the target.

If you can achieve this feeling, you will inevitably hit the ball more solid and consistently as I did today.

Well, that’s all for today folks, have a great weekend and I will tell you all about my round tomorrow.

P.S. Oh yeah, my chipping is awesome now, I kept it simple now getting everything within a foot!  If you haven’t practiced your short game (even though I haven’t wrote much on it lately), YOU SHOULD!!!

How to Take Slow Motion Golf Swing Videos!

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

I’ve actually noticed bunch of YouTube videos online of these awesome slow motion golf swing videos and noticed that everyone was using selective Casio Exilim series, which can do like up to 6,000 frames per second.

I found that these cameras below will let you take super slow motion golf swing videos:

  • Casio Exilim EX-FC100 – These go for about $219.95 on Amazon, really good deal for capturing up to 1000 frames per second, which beats most other digital cameras for the price and purpose of taking slow motion golf swing videos.
  • Casio Exilim FH20 – This is the higher end version that can cost about $550.  If you want to use it more than a slow-motion golf swing camera, this might be a good way to invest more and get more out of it.

Here’s some videos showing the capabilities of these Casio Exlim digital cameras:

Slow-motion golf swing with Casio Exilim EX-FC100:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Slow-motion golf swing with Casio Exilim FH20:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Of course, I don’t really advice to you analyze your own swing unless you are at least an 8 handicap and have some experience tinkering with your own swing.   Otherwise, you might be better off getting a real golf pro to look at your swing.

Also, you can use V1 swing software to analyze your swing.

I should be getting the cheaper EX-FC100 to test it out soon, I need one really bad, technology has gotten so good, it’s unbelievable!

UPDATE: I also found that Casio Exilim EX-FS10 does slow motion golf swing videos too, the cheapest of all at $179.

Weekend Warriors – How to Hit the Ball More Consistently!

Sunday, August 23rd, 2009

Most of us don’t have the time that it takes to perfect a golf swing nor maintain it.  For those weekend warriors, here’s couple swing tips that have actually worked for me:

  • Don’t fight your swing, whether you hit a draw or fade on that day, just play that shot.
  • Keep your swing smooth but make sure your followthrough is longer than your backswing.  This makes sure you accelerate through the golf ball without over-swinging.  This is probably the best tip for keeping your ball flight consistent even if you hardly practice.
  • Keeping your ball flight consistent, whether that’s a slice or hook,  comes first.  If you can hit the ball with a consistent ball flight, you don’t have to hit the ball straight and still score good.  I’ve seen hundreds of scratch golfers who have bad swings but they have consistent ball flights.
  • Don’t ever try to “correct” your swing, just go with the flow and work with your flawed swing.  Again, consistency rules over straight shots.  Even pro golfers don’t try to hit the ball straight.  Jack Nicklaus and Fred Couple hit fades all through major championships, you should pick a side too.
  • Practice more short game and putting, that’s where your advantage is or even Tiger’s for that matter, not in the 300+ yard driver.  Although it’d be good to hit it 300+ yards off the tee, that’s the last thing that’s gonna help you score near par.

I’ve been playing golf for over 20+ years now and more I realize that perfecting your golf swing has more to do with scoring bad  than trying to work with what you already have.

Even me, I have less time to practice than before since I have to run my online publishing business.   I score better when I try to find ways to keep my swing more consistent by doing less.

Less is more, especially in golf.  No matter how many personal golf lessons you get, it’s probably worthless if you change your swing everytime you go out on the golf course.  Stop tinkering and start playing golf.

Here’s a simple exercise if you tend to end up in vicious cycle of trying to fix your swing.

1. Don’t practice on the range anymore.

2. Don’t try to fix your swing on the golf course.

3. Keep playing more golf and try to work on your golf strategy to fit your ball flight.

4. keep doing 1 to 3 until your ball flight is consistent and you have find a working golf course strategy.

5. If you must, fix your swing once every 3 months.

Happy golfing!

Lucas Glover Golf Swing Analysis!

Friday, July 10th, 2009

As you probably well know, Lucas Glover edged out my former junior golf colleague Ricky Barnes during this year’s U.S. Open 2009, beating numerous great golfers like Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, and David Duval.

Needless to say, let’s go over Lucas Glover’s swing to see what makes him a “major” champion.

At address, Lucas Glover really gets his head behind the ball, his upper spine and head both tilted slightly towards the target.  This slight move helps you to hit the driver on the upswing and also makes sure your head stays behind the ball during the swing.

Lucas has a very strong grip which also goes well with this type of setup.  His feet are about 10 degrees open each.

*Notice that his head is almost over his right foot, not something you’d teach someone but it works for Lucas Glover.

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On the takeaway, Lucas Glover takes away very very wide, sorta like Tiger, I bet he tried to copy Tiger’s move here.

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About half-way, Lucas is still very “wide”.  The way Lucas Glover swing the golf club reminds me almost of a slingshot.  Don’t get me wrong though, I’ve seen a handful of great players who have a “slingshot” golf swing.  This isn’t a bad thing so if you do this, keep doing it.

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At the top of Lucas Glover’s swing (or transition since his hips are already moving down now), Lucas doesn’t overswing, he actually has a pretty compact backswing although it’s hard to notice when you see it in full speed.  Watch carefully as this is when Lucas does the “slingshot” move, he will practically drop his shoulders, arms, and hands straight down.

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I don’t know if you notice here but, Lucas Glover is coming on a very steep angle in contrast to his takeaway and backswing.  This isn’t my favorite way to swing the golf club as your shoulders and hands must compensate for the difference.

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At impact, Lucas Glover drops his body a bit (like everyone) but his feet are still on the ground and his left shoulder to the clubhead forms a perfectly straight line, probably his key to consistency.

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After impact, watch how straight both Lucas Glover’s arms are, that is really good stuff.  And also note his feet are still on the ground!!!  (and yes that is awesome.)

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Lucas Glover’s finish is what I like most about his swing.  See how straight his body is?  This isn’t just good for consistent golf, it’s also great for your back.

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Overall, I’d give Lucas Glover’s swing 8 out of 10.  Lucas didn’t win the U.S. Open with his swing, he also had some good luck with the weather and pairings.  Of course, Lucas has a really good short game and mentally “tougher” than the others.

Here’s Lucas Glover’s Golf Swing in Slow-motion video:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

The stuff you need to learn from Lucas Glover’s Swing:

1. Wide takeaway - Wide takeaway isn’t just for hitting the ball, it also let you swing more free as you can “feel” the centripetal force as you swing back.

If you want to learn to do a wide takeaway, simply put only your right hand on the club and try to swing back like you are holding a slingshot.  If you can feel that, apply it on your real swing.

2. Stable Impact - You want to learn to hit the golf ball without losing your balance.  Next time you are on the range, try to develop a stable impact position by “staying up” through impact.  You will almost feel like you are standing up at impact if you do this right.  In fact, you want to feel like you are standing up during your whole swing.

3. Great Finish – Great finish usually result in great balance and that you end up standing tall like Lucas Glover.  Next time you are at the range, finish your golf swing and stand “tall” afterwards and hold your finish for 3 seconds.  If you can do that, that means you have kept your balance through the swing.

More cool balancing exercises – Take a golf pencil, bite it with your mouth and try to hit full shots without losing your golf pencil.  If you can master this, your body will automatically learn to balance and swing better.

Well, that’s about it for today folks, I will try to have more golf swing analysis later this week so I hope you get better at golf!

Go practice now, don’t just sit there and read golf blogs.

Nick Faldo Downhill Iron Swing Analysis

Monday, July 14th, 2008

Nick Faldo Downhill Iron Swing Analysis

For most of 90s, my two favorite golfers were Nick Faldo and Greg Norman.  They always seemed to win tournaments more than others during that time and also shared number one and two of the world back and forth.

Although Nick Faldo may be a sportscaster right now, he may be the best pro golfer to be a sportscaster.

You look at some of the other guys but no one else has an extensive resume like the Masters winner Nick Faldo.

I’ve even bought every book he wrote and although they were all too technical and confusing for most hackers, Nick is really good at details of the golf swing.

Let’s take a look at his downhill iron swing here.

For the downhill iron shot, Nick Faldo sets up with his weight favoring his right and his ball about center of his stance to make up for the hill.

At takeaway, Nick sets his wrists slightly early but looks very good.

At top of Nick’s swing, he has a perfect 90 degree angle between the arm and the club while not swinging more than 3/4 of his full backswing.

On half-way down, notice the 90 degree of lag Nick has.  A lot of tour pros go beyond the 90 degrees which is not necessary and Nick proves the point here.  Too much lag can actually produce a smaller swing arc.

At impact, Nick looks really good.

After impact, Nick chases down the slope with his arms, fully releasing his club.

At finish, Nick looks very good, standing super tall.

Nick Faldo has one of the best swings in golf with one of the best rhythms to go with it.

If he kept playing competitively, he would have won couple more majors but I am surprised he decided to retire from competitive golf.

Here’s Nick Faldo’s downhill iron swing in slow-motion explained by the man himself:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Having Nick on golf channels is a really good thing.  I rather hear him saying stuff than an Peter Kostis.

Charlie Wi Driver Swing Analysis

Tuesday, July 8th, 2008

Charlie Wi is one of the Korean golfers who have been coming up in the last couple years.  I guess he is using Stack and Tilt swing now but let’s take a look.

To me, Stack and Tilt isn’t a new way of swinging, it’s simply teachers re-making golf swing.

At takeaway, Charlie gets way too inside.  Look at his hands, it’s almost inside his body.

At half-way up, Charlie looks pretty good.

At the top, Charlie is in pretty much perfect plane.

At half-way down, Charlie looks really good and also standing VERY TALL.

At impact, Charlie is looking great.

Charlie Wi has a great swing regardless of what “swing” he is using.  The only iffy part is that his hands get way too inside on the takeaway but he does everything else well.

Here’s Charlie Wi’s stack and tilt Driver swing in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Anthony Kim Driver Swing Analysis

Saturday, July 5th, 2008

Okay, today, we will do a “real” swing analysis of Anthony Kim’s swing. (unlike my older post on Anthony Kim’s swing video only)

Now, this young man gas a great swing and might start taking over PGA Tour with multiple wins.

At takeaway, Anthony is a little too much inside. (This is what the “traditional” golf teachers teach you. But don’t be fooled, the follow-through will prove that Anothony “came back” to the right plane to hit the ball, which almost every pro tour golfer does)

At half-way, Anthony is still way too inside but that’s okay as it will get from here on.

At top os his swing, you can see how well his hands, and clubface are in-plane. (The four diagonal lines represent the true plane of the golf swing)

At downswing, Anthony is slightly inside the plane, which is perfectly acceptable.

At impact, notice how his left arms is straight and right arms slightly bent like at address.

Now what impresses me about Anthony Kim’s swing is not his takeaway or backswing but right after impact.

As you can see, his clubface is almost dead-on or slightly outside the plane. This movement is actually the best move. (Players like Ben Hogan and Tiger Woods do this)

After impact, it gets even better as Anthony’s club stays on-plane.

At finish, check out how controlled his right foot is, it’s barely coming up.

What can you learn from Anthony Kim’s swing?

There are many ways to swing the club. Try to focus on getting that club on-plane at the top of your swing and after impact.

Even most tour pros have completely different opinions on how to swing on-plane but their after impact positions will be the same.

Here’s Anthony Kim’s swing in slow-motion (SWING VISION):

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Ian Poulter Driver Swing Analysis – 1 Plane Swing

Monday, June 23rd, 2008

Ian Poulter comes as close to a 1-plane swing other than Tiger or Adam Scott in my mind.

Let me show you why.

Take a look at how Ian’s clubface is pretty much dead on-plane. A lot of pro tour players are inside this point, Ian does pretty well of keeping that club wide and extended. I love Ian’s takeaway, everyone should copy this…

At half-way point, Ian is still on-plane, maybe slightly flat but that’s good enough.

At top of Ian’s swing, his hands are “almost” on plane. It’s a little upright but it’s okay.

Also note that his club is pointing way left of target, this usually is okay as long as Ian is on-plane.

At half-way down, Ian is perfectly slightly inside the plane.

At impact, Ian does a pretty good job. There actually space in-between his right elbow and hips. This is a good thing and he has not “dipped” a lot like a other players.

After impact, Ian’s extension shows that he’s on perfect plane. Also note how “tall” Ian is standing. This is great for hitting the ball good and the back.

What a lovely finish.

What to learn from this?

There are lots of ways to swing the golf club. Some can hurt your back some can help your back but both achieve the same results as far as golf shot goes.

You need to pick the right swing mechanics for your golf game so you don’t end up one day with a golf swing you can’t play as you get older.

Swing Tip: Try to stand very very tall when swinging the club. Never stress your body, let the club do the work for you. If you swing the club and you feel tired after couple swings, you are probably not swinging, but “bashing” or “hitting” the ball. Never hit the ball, let it come in the way of your swing.

Watch out as I think this young Ian guy can win lots of tournaments in the near future.

Here’s Ian Poulter’s swing in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode