Archive for the ‘Swing Tips’ Category

How to Divide Up Your Practice Time!

Sunday, February 22nd, 2009

One of the major mistakes that golfers make is how they spend their time practicing golf.

If you are one of those people who bang 2-3 buckets per day but have been lazy to hit putts on the putting green, watch out, someone’s gonna take your money.

Here’s a simple guideline on how you should divide up your practice time:

50% – Mix of iron and woods.  These are mostly full shots.

50% – Shortgame consisting of putting, chipping, and chipping.

If you don’t have access to a putting green, you can still do short game on the driving range.  Take your sand or lob wedge and hit to different “short” targets around 30 to 75 yards.  Believe me, this will do wonders for your pitching game.

How to Practice with Less Balls at the Driving Range!

Saturday, February 21st, 2009

Today, let me give you a couple tips that will save you money at the driving range, all the while getting a better practice session every time you go out there.

Here’s a couple rules I used to “live” by when I used to play mini-tour events:

1. For every practice shot, make sure you do 2-3 practice swings.  That’s right, practice makes perfect, not simply banging balls.

2. For every practice shot, before the shot, imagine and visualize how the golf ball will react after you hit the ball.

3. For every practice shot, before the shot, imagine and visualize how you will swing.  Visualize yourself swinging that ball perfectly in rhythm and balance.

Believe me, mind does some awesome stuff for golf.

4. For every practice shot, line-up your shot before hitting the ball from behind the ball like a real shot.

Why would you practice as if it “wasn’t” real?  Every shot I practice is the same as the shot I hit under pressure.

This type of mentality helps your conscious to stay the “same” even when playing for real money.  On the other hand, banging a lot of balls perfect does the opposite to you when you play because you are simply not that perfect, not even Tiger.

5. For every practice shot, imagine a real green, bunkers, and fairways.  You should always have a target on your practice shot and it’s even better if you can imagine hitting a certain shot for EVERY practice shot.

6. For every practice shot, hit a different club.  You don’t hit the same club over and over again on the golf course, why would you make it that easy for yourself on the driving range?

Basically, all these tips make you spend most of your time getting ready for your golf shot, just like a real golf shot on the golf course.

Now, if you can’t even hit your pitching wedge past 50 yards, this might not be a good advice for you.  But if you have broken 80 or 90 already and you want to get better mentally, this is how you gotta practice.

Maybe not all the time but most of time, you will reap the benefits of hitting every practice shot after you are mentally and physically ready for it.

Using this method, I usually do 500 practice swing with just 100 practice balls and my practice’s quality goes UP, way high.  And this shows on the golf course if I shoot couple under.

Driver DIY – How to Add 30 Yards to Your Game in 30 Days!

Saturday, February 21st, 2009

Well, as a pro golfer who knows all the ins and outs of playing, practicing, and scoring golf, we all WANT to hit the ball very far.

I am not going to be teaching you any golf swing techniques here but I am going to teach you couple tricks that can potentially add 30 yards to your drives in just 30 days.

1. Get a weighted golf club and swing it daily in your home slowly about 20-30 times.

Now you don’t have to buy this weighted golf club.  What I do is take bunch of pennies (like 200 of them) and duct tape them to one of your old golf clubs.  That will get you about 5-10 pounds of weight depending on the number of pennies you attach.

Swing the golf club very very slowly.  This is about building the golf muscles, not hitting the ball.  Try to really feel that your abdomen is controlling the whole swing during this exercise.

2. For every practice session at the driving range, take your driver and hit 10 balls as HARD as you can.

You need to learn to control your swing when you swing hard and fast, the only way to do that is to swing as hard as you can.  Now I said just 10 balls, don’t do it for all your shots, that will ruin your swing and rhythm.

3. Do the above steps 1 and 2 at least 3-5 times a week for a month.

I bet you’ve added another 30 yards to your driver.

I didn’t include working out or lifting-weights here but that helps too so long as you are working on the correct muscles.  I find that chest lifting exercises help but let me get into that later, I have a specific golf workout routine that I have been using for about 14 years and that’s been helping me hit the ball 320+ yards consistently.  Stay tuned folks.

How to Teach Your Baby to Be Better Than Tiger Woods!

Monday, January 19th, 2009

Well, I’ve decided to start a series of online blog golf lessons for teaching your baby to be better than Tiger Woods.

Of course, if you are a parent and you want your child to be on the PGA/LPGA tour someday, these are the lessons you will need to read.

The first thing you need to do is get your baby to get familiar with the golf grip, golf ball, and the golf club as soon as possible.

  • Age 1-3 months – Swing a golf club in front of your baby at least couple times a week.  “Monkey see, Monkey do.”  You can start as early as soon as your kid is born.  Tiger didn’t really start until he was 18 month old, you can get your kid a better chance by starting earlier than Tiger.
  • Age 3-6 months – Make a plastic-toy grip for your 3-6 month old baby to play with.  The earlier that your baby gets familiar with a golf grip, the quicker he/she will be able to control the club when he/she grows up.  You can order a junior grip from Golfsmith and pick up a plastic PVC pipe that will fit the grip at Home Depot.
  • Age 9-12 months – Take your 9-12 month baby to the driving range.  You can get one of these  Walking Wings to help her/him stand while you help her/him hit a real golf ball with your arms controlling the club while baby has her/his hands on the grip.  Also the putting green is great for babies to walk on while learning to putt.

Also, skip the plastic golf toys, they are too “plastic” and it’s probably better to get your baby learning with the “real” stuff ASAP.  Heck, you can make your own cut-down custom clubs by ordering parts from Golfsmith.

Am I being realistic here?

Yes, this is how you can get your baby to learn to hit a golf club before she/he learns how to feed himself/herself with a spoon.  If your baby learns to swing the golf club as something 2nd nature to him/her, he/she’s going to be ahead of 99.9% of population by the time he/she plays junior golf tournaments.

Trust me, I am a pro golfer, you need to get your baby started EARLY!  I started when I was 9 years old and I can see that I too could have played a lot better if I started when I was 1 month old.

Swing Thoughts!

Friday, December 12th, 2008

Well, I took most of the last 3 months off from golf due to my new business developments but I had finally took the time to go out golfing the other day.

I hit the ball pretty good as usual, here’s my swing thoughts:

1. Control the swing with your body.

2. Develop a good continuous rhythm, similar to dancing or rappin’.

3. Stay centered over your body and balanced.

Justin Timberlake Opens a Golf Course!

Thursday, October 2nd, 2008

Justin Timberlake recently opened a new golf course.

But here’s the fun part, a swing analysis on Justin Timerlake’s followthrough:

1. His left arm is straight.

2. Right right arm is almost straight too.

3. Looks almost like Tiger here.

I am not too surprised Justin can play to a 4 handicap, congrats.

The singer Justin Timberlake likes to play a round of golf when he has the time, but soon he can play on his own eco friendly golf course, to be known as Miramichi Lakes.

The golf course is not brand new; in fact, the golf course was in some trouble before Justin stepped in and saved it. Once completed it is expected to be granted Platinum LEED certified green course standard, the first of its kind in the USA.

via green blog

Jim Furyk Driver Swing Analysis

Monday, July 7th, 2008

Jim Furyk has always been one of my golfing heroes due to the fact that he’s swing is probably the weirdest on the PGA Tour yet he is so successful.

Although Jim Furyk might breaks all rules of physics and textbook teaching, I will prove today that he does have one of the best after impact positions in golf.

At setup, Jim’s hands are pretty much “glued” to his thighs and he stands very very close to the ball.

On takeaway, Jim’s clubface is shut and a little inside the plane.

At half-way, Jim is actually on-plane with the hands but his club is very upright.

At the top of the swing, Jim is pretty much trying to get his hands as vertical as he can.  This is not a bad thing as even Jack Nicklaus tells you to do this at one point in his career.

Vertical swings have been great for hitting the ball very high.

Now the greatest part about Jim is that he re-routes his club back into perfect hitting position as seen here.

He’s actually slightly inside the plane, allowing a perfect setup for inside-out swing.

At impact, Jim must turn his hips, shoulders, head, and everything except the club in order to square the clubface.   Not the easiest way to swing but watch for the next action.

Check out how perfectly Jim’s club is on-plane.  This is something that almost every top golfer does regardless of how they swing the club back.

This is why Jim is on the PGA Tour.

Great finish, and another legendary swing that no one will ever be able to copy.

Here’s Jim Furyk’s driver in action:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

Secret to a Consistent Golf Swing

Thursday, July 3rd, 2008

Well, today I kept thinking about how I have been hitting the golf ball for the last 20 or so years of my life and by examining the top golfers in the world, I have come to a conclusion that I have finally found the secret to a consistent golf swing.

Here’s the secret to a consistent golf swing:

“Keep the swing in motion”

What do I mean by that?

Well, if you have noticed, every top golfer waggles his club before starting his/her swing.

The waggle is simply a preview “feel” of you swing before you swing the club.

For example, unlike other sports, Golf requires you to start at a static position. (similar to a Basketball free throw shot)

Once you start your golf swing, you don’t ever want to disrupt or stop your motion in anyway.

How can you achieve this?

You need to think outside the box and think of a swing as a one continuous motion just like throwing a baseball or shooting a basketball.

One continuous motion requires that your whole swing flows at one continuous speed.

Ben Hogan used to start his downswing before the completion of his backswing.  In reality, the concept backswing, impact, and the finish are only “snapshots” of your one continuous swing.

Do not try to achieve a backswing position, rather try to swing in one-motion.  To correct any swing flaws in your swing, you need to do that while keeping in mind that a swing is one continuous motion.

So next time you head out to the range, practice swinging in one continuous motion.

Drills for feeling this?

You can setup about 5 to 10 balls in front of you and try to hit them all, one-by-one, without stopping your swing.  This drill is actually very well-known by most teachers and pros but it will definitely teach you the “feel” of one continuous swing and help you swing with “feel” and less “mechanics”.

Well, that’s all for today folks, this might be the best secret, of course for making few bucks off your golf buddies and winning that club championship.

I might analyze a lot of the pro swings, but you have to realize golf is not a game of swing mechanics, but of swing motion.

Phil Mickelson Front View Swing Analysis

Saturday, May 24th, 2008

Phil Mickelson is doing great today over at the Crown Plaza Invitational.  Let’s look at his swing and see what kind of great things Phil is doing these days.

At address position, you can clearly see the triangle formed by Phil and the angle he is setting up to the iron shot.  The angle is not as important but it does help him set his right arm and the club very very straight.

At takeaway, check out how well he keeps his triangle in tact.

On the downswing, you can also see the triangle.  Triangles are the key to a good golf swing.  Pros might translate triangles into different words but the secret is in the 3 pointed shape.

Check out how well formed the triangle is at impact.

On the followthrough, Phil has great extension of both arms and his left arm and the club are almost completely straight.

Let’s hope good ol’ Phil wins tomorrow.

Here’s Phil in video:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

How to Practice for Junior Golfers aspiring to go Pro!

Wednesday, May 21st, 2008

Well, one of our readers asked about her 15 year daughter coming down with a serious Golf Flu and asked me how to practice and what kind of program she should follow.

As a person who went through all that, here are my answers:

Lessons, how often and from whom?

For lessons, you need to first find a good teacher.  Try to sought out a local pro who has “experience” in pro tournament play.  It doesn’t have to be the PGA Tour, but the pro you take lessons should at least be able to break par every now and then.  Try to find a pro who gives you a “personalized” lesson, not a “do it this way or you die” type of a pro.

Every golfer has their own perfect swing.  A great teacher will help him/her find that.   There’s no textbook “set way” on how to swing the club.  Pros who condone that are the ones to stay away from.

There are lots of self-claimed “pros” that have no tournament experience and will not get your kid to play well under pressure nor teach well.  DO NOT take lessons from pros who sit on a chair all day.  Try to find someone who is also willing to take your kid out on the course for course strategy lessons.

Are the golf academies worth it?

Golf academies are worthless.  Most golf academies put you with several teachers that will only confuse your junior golfer.  Try to stick with “private” one-on-one lessons and get personalized lessons.  But golf camps are fun for the junior golfers.

How much and how often should you practice?

Your junior golfer should play more often than practice until she can break par.  My recommendation is to practice about 1 hour on the range (a bucket of balls), 1 hour on chipping/putting, and the rest of time on the course.  Always practice your short game as much as your full shots, that’s the key to breaking par.

Is the range a good place to focus before going to the course?

Yes, most pros actually spend about 15-20 minutes warming up on the range before they hit the course.  You definitely need to warm up before playing, otherwise it’s like working out from a cold start.

Equipment?

You don’t need great equipment to start out.  A lot of new golfers buy new golf clubs and never play golf at all.

You can go to Play It Again Sports or buy some used clubs at your local golf shop to begin with.

After your kid breaks 80, you can go buy her/him a “custom-tailored” set matching her height and angles.  But you don’t need this in the beginning unless you have money to throw away.   Besides, nothing can be “custom-tailored” right until your kid breaks at least 80, which is a good sign she has a consistent swing.

Where should a teenager be with the game after a certain period of time?

Well, it depends.  It took me about 4 years before I broke 90. (I was 13…)  Golf is not easy but if your daughter is 15 years old, she will need to break 80 in the next year or two to be competitive.

In all, try to enjoy the game.  Having the goal to have fun will improve her game more than anything.  Trying to be too competitive will only kill her efforts.  Short game is really the key again because short game requires more “feel” and practice than any lessons can give you.  My advice is to practice the short game more than anything on the extra time allotted.

Also, do not burn out your child, let your kid be a normal kid and enjoy life.  There’s no need to practice/play golf all day long.  You need to keep your kid’s desire in check and fresh.  No food taste the same after eating it 100 days in a row, just use your common sense.

I hope that helps and let me know if my advice helped your daughter! :)