Archive for the ‘Golf DIY’ Category

How to Make a DIY Backyard Putting Green!

Saturday, June 11th, 2011

Well, folks, I’ve moved into my new place that has a “yard” finally.  It’s a small yard but one of the first things I did was to build my own DIY backyard putting green.

I used to work at the golf course so I know a little bit about growing grass but this DIY putting green was just something created out of my head after doing some research online.

There’s a lot of crap information out there telling you that you need a drainage system, well, I think that’s overkill for your backyard.

Instead, you can use some basic stuff to put together a small DIY putting green for about $100.

Of course, my putting green isn’t finished by all means but let me share with you what I did in just 3 hours to make a mini putting green.

Also, I don’t really need a huge putting green, I just need a small putting green so I can practice some short putts 10 feet in, which is what I practice most anyways and the most important putts.

First, you will need to get some putting green grass.  If you live in a hot weather southern area like Texas, you will want to grow some bermuda grass.

If you live in a cold weather area like me near the ocean, you will want to grow some bentgrass.

I personally prefer bentgrass over bermuda because it’s more finer surface to putt on and there’s less grain.  You can still grow some bentgrass in hot areas, perhaps you can put a canopy tent over it so your grass is always under some shade, that could be a solution.

Bentgrass has many different types but the most popular is the Penncross Creeping Bentgrass, which was developed at Penn State in the 50s.  I guess this is the most popular putting green grass used on also major championship golf courses.

Anyways, I ordered 5 pounds of Penncross Creeping Bentgrass off Amazon for $54.99.  Btw, you can’t get bentgrass seeds from retail stores like Home Depot, OSH, or Lowes, the seeds they sell are mostly mix of fescue, bluegrass, and other types of grass.  They will NOT work for your putting green so don’t get them!

Second, I bought some edging for my new mini putting green to block it away from the rest of my lawn as I don’t want other grass/weed growing on my new putting green.  Since I have plans for extending my new putting green later down the line, I bought edging that could be easily lifted off later.   These Fiber Edges are pretty good and what I am using, $37.12 on Amazon.

So, I started digging couple days back, my original idea was to just make a tiny bit of green to replicate it slowly to the rest of my lawn but I decided at last minute to just use the whole edging I bought to make around 6x6x6 green.

I first laid out my edging as shown below and used the stakes it came with to hold it in place.

Next, I wanted to put the edging in first so I dug up the edges and secured my edging.

Next, I started digging up everything and putting the dirt on the sides.  This is my first time actually making a backyard green so I just improvised as I went along.

Next, I was going to filter out all the old grass and weed but that was going to take me all day to do.  Since I was going to lay some weedblocker over, I simply dumped all the old grass back onto the green but making it so the surface is flat.

This particular part of the lawn sits on a big slope so I used the dirt I excavated to re-adjust the slope so I will end up with a relatively flat green with a slight slope.

As you can see from the sideview, I’ve used my edging to add some flatness to my new putting green so it’s not as sloped as the rest of the yard is.

Next, I cut up the rolls of weedblocker and used the weedblocker staples to put them on the new putting green so weed and the old grass won’t grow into my new green.

I bought 3 cubic feet of some garden soil and dumped the whole thing on top.

 

Since I was winging this whole putting green, I used my tennis shoes to pat down on the garden soil to compact it a bit and did lots of swiping with my feet to get everything evenly surfaced.  I am sure you can do better than this but I didn’t want to take another trip to the hardware store at this point, I wanted to finish the job.

But it did end up pretty nice as you can see, it’s pretty even.

Next, I spread the Penncross Creeping Bentgrass seeds all over the garden soil.

For the final finish, I topped it off with a slight layer of sand to keep the seeds from sun burns.

I think the whole thing cost me just over a hundred dollars and I was surprised even at myself for finishing the whole green in just matter of hours.

Some more thoughts.

I intentionally picked the most sloped part of my lawn, since it’s the least used plus water would drain well.  I would try to find a slightly sloped surface to put your backyard putting green since it will drain better plus you need a slight slope to practice different right-to-left and left-to-right putts.  (Why would you practice straight putts only?!?)

I figure that would also save me thousands of dollars or more hours over building a full-out drainage system, just build it on a slope.

With my new putting green, I can practice right-to-left putts, left-to-right putts, straight putts, and downhill/uphill putts.  I can’t practice long putts on it but I am planning for that later down the road.

Cutting the Greens

For true putting, I will eventually need to get a low-cutting mower that is able to cut less than 1/2 inch , which costs over/around $1,000 on average.

Most lawnmowers can really only cut up to about an inch at most but I found this bentgrass mower online that can cut up to 1/2 inch in height.  At 1/2 inch, I might still have a decent green so we will see and perhaps I can hack the bentgrass mower to cut it even lower.

 

Why did I build this green?

Honestly, I’ve always wanted to putt in the comfort of my backyard because it’s such a big part of your golf game.  You can go to your local golf course and practice but it’s not going to be the same with all that foot traffic everyone else dumps on the practice green.  With my own putting green, I won’t blame anyone but myself.

Also, I’ve always wanted to record some putting green HOWTO videos for this blog but I can’t carry my heavy tri-pod and DSLR camera everytime I go to the golf course but this makes it possible for me to do that.

Why did I not get a synthetic green?

I just don’t think synthetic greens are anywhere near real putting greens.  Plus, I love growing grass, it’s one of the most rewarding things to do when you see your seeds grow.

 

Anyways, I will have an updated photo/video of my new putting green in about 10 days when it should have grown fully.

 

 

 

 

 

How to Make Your Own Putting Green in the Backyard!

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

For those of you with a bit of gardening skills, you might want to consider making your own putting green in the backyard.  I am not talking about those fake ones (I don’t like astroturf putting too much) but growing your own putting grass seeds.

First, you will need to find a relatively flat area in your backyard.

Second, plan out how big your backyard will be.

Third, you will need to determine what kind of putting green grass you will use.  For most cool-to-warm climates, you might want to go with bentgrass.   For people in Texas and southern states, you can try bermuda.

You can get some really high-quality bentgrass on Amazon here.

Fourth, you need to get that area in your backyard ready for seeding.  You can get the soil loosened first then get rid all weeds/debris.  Once that’s done, simply put the seeds all over the soil, then top it off with a thin layer of sand.

Keep the area moist at all times by watering 2-3 times daily.

After few weeks, you should have a new green, start mowing when it’s around 2-3 inches then you can mow it shorter for putting.

Also, you can aerate/replicate the green to other parts of your yard by using the ProPlugger, I find this the best tool out there for Do-It-Yourselfers.

If the putting green area isn’t drained well, perhaps water overfills, you might want to add a layer of gravel under the green.

Here’s another resource for building your own putting green.

 

 

How to Make your own DIY Golf Clubhead Cover!

Friday, July 30th, 2010

Want to make your own DIY golf clubhead cover?  It’s actually pretty darn easy, take one sock and your favorite animal and sew them up together!

Unfold the sock from around the animal. Stuff the filling back into the animal. Make sure you refill the head or toes or tail of the animal if applicable. Do not put all of the stuffing back in. You want to leave enough room for the club head. After replacing the stuffing, sew the toe end of the sock shut so the stuffing will not come back out. Stuff the foot of the sock inside your new Club Head Cover and you are done.

via instructables

DIY Parachute Golf Balls to Full Shot Practice!

Friday, November 20th, 2009

paragolf

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

I’ve seen a handful of golf ball gadgets for short-range practice but these homemade parachute golf balls are the most innovative and ones that could let you feel a real golf ball while not breaking your neighbor’s windows.  Brilliant!

How To Make Toddler Golf Clubs!

Saturday, November 7th, 2009

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Today, I will show you how to make custom-fit (custom length) golf clubs for your toddler/kids.

Whether your toddler is a 12 month year old who’s 1.5 feet tall or a 3 year old 2.5 feet tall, making custom-fit golf clubs can dramatically improve chances of your child playing better golf.

The problem is that most of toddler/junior golf clubs bought off the rack at the retail stores or online are too long for these young, aspiring golfers.

If you want your child to be as good as Tiger Woods or to simply enjoy golf at an early age, it’s vital that you either cut junior golf clubs to fit their height or make toddler golf clubs from scratch as I am showing you in this blog post.

For one, most 2 year olds already possess enough muscle strength to hit a golf ball except there’s no golf clubs made for them!

By making these custom-length golf clubs, your child will be able to get a head start on golf, perhaps play better than you by the time they reach 9.

One of my friend’s daughters is trying to play golf and my friend has asked some advice so I’ve decided to make this 7-iron and driver for her.

And yes, plastic golf clubs would work too but real golf clubs would be ideal if the toddler wants to start improving his/her game from day one.

So, here it goes, this is actually my first attempt at making junior golf clubs and I haven’t done clubmaking in 10 years so I am a bit rusty.   But bear with me as I get the job done.

First, you will need some of the most basic golf clubmaking tools listed here:

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Epoxy – You can get any regular epoxy at your local hardware store.  Golfsmith and other golf clubmaking stores sell these golf epoxies but they are pretty much the same thing so you don’t need to spend extra $5 on them, just get it for cheaper at Home Depot.  I got mine for like $5 at Home Depot btw.

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Sand Paper – You will need some sand paper to prep the shaft so you can epoxy your clubhead to it.  If you have machine tools, that might work too but for the purposes of saving money too, you can just use some plain sand paper.

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Shaft Cutting Tool – You can use a fine-blade saw or a machine tool to cut your shaft.  If you don’t have them, the other best way is to get one of these golf shaft cutting tools.  I have had mine for over 10 years and they are great for cutting golf shafts plus they don’t take up much room if you live in a small apartment. ($9.99 at Golfsmith)
*Note – You can get the Chop Saw, which might be better if you are making a whole set of clubs.

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Junior Clubheads – For starters, you can probably start with any junior golf clubhead.  I went with a Snake Eyes Junior 7-iron($8.99) and a driver($17.99).  (There’s even cheaper ones too over at GolfSmith, check it out here.)

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Junior Golf Grips – Junior golf grips are slightly smaller than regular grips and you will need these.  I got the Junior Tour Velvet grips ($1.79 each) but there’s other choices as well.

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Double-sided Grip Tape – You need a double-sided grip tape so you can stick the golf grip onto the  golf shaft.  For this, I highly recommend the water-activated grip tape which requires no toxic solvents and easy to apply with plain water and a bit of soap.  Traditionally, you had to use toxic solvent plus a double-sided tape, which is faster to install but bad for our environment. (plus costs more for the solvent).

ferrules

Ferrules (optional) - For a finished look, you will want to get some ferrules.  The ferrules are different for irons($2.99 for dozen) and woods($2.49 for dozen).  But these are optional, they don’t really do anything but add to the overall “look” and do not affect the perfomance of your toddler golf clubs.

Standard sizes for iron ferrules are .370″ in diameter and wood ferrules are .335″ in diameter.  If you get special shafts you might need a custom ferrule but for most golf clubs, these sizes are standard, even for adult golf clubs.  There’s more styles of ferrules to choose from here but make a note that you get the right sized ferrules.

You might also want to consider getting a Ferrule installer if you want ferrule installation to be quicker/easier.

Total Cost

Total cost per club should be pretty cheap $20 per iron and about $30 per wood, still cheaper than buying off the racks.  Plus, the golf tools you buy can be used over and over for future clubmaking, not a bad investment at all.  I’ve also used the minimal number of tools here as I don’t like having big tools or spending too much money on them. (yet at least)

Not only are it’s a great skill to learn but as your toddler grows up, you will be able to provide them with custom shafts, which they will need if they are going to take golf to the next level.

How to Find the Right Length for Fitting the Golf Shaft

Before making the golf clubs, you will want to find out exactly the length your toddler needs to hit the ball optimally.

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Measure out how long your golf club should be by setting the shaft on your toddler child.  Then, make a mark with a permanent marker.  As a rough guide, try to get about 50 degrees from the ground to the child’s hands.  Where their hands end  on the shaft should be where you should mark the golf club.

Don’t worry if you do it the wrong first time, you can always cut the shaft and put a new grip if you make it too long.

Just don’t make it too short, then you will have to install a new shaft so…

How to Cut the Golf Shaft

Obviously, if you have a power tool or get the Chop Saw, you can easily cut the shaft but if you get the shaft cutting tool, you can  follow these directions.

Simply set the shaft to the shaft cutting tool in the middle groove then adjust the knob so it fits tightly.

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Rotate the shaft once  and tighten the knob a 1/4 of a turn, then keep repeating until the shaft if cut.

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You should get a nicely cut shaft like here:
And save the leftover shaft for later as it can be used as a ferrule installation tool.

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Video 1 of shaft cutting:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

How to Install the Ferrule (Optional)

If you’ve decided to install the ferrules, there’s some extra steps to do, otherwise you can skip this step.

*Note – If you bought the Ferrule Installer, follow directions for that, it should be MUCH easier/faster.  I am just showing you my hack without spending extra $10.

First, fit your clubhead to the tip of your shaft snuggly.  Then make a mark with a permanent marker where your clubhead ends on the shaft.  This will be where the ferrule must stop.

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Next, apply some oil or WD40 to the tip of the shaft so you can easily slide your ferrule in.

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Next, put the ferrule on the tip of the shaft.  If it get stuck just bang it softly couple times until the ferrule goes in.

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You should get to this point where the ferrule is about here.  If the ferrule is stuck, don’t worry, we will use the leftover shaft piece from earlier to bang it down a bit.

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Using the leftover shaft piece (you can also cut it even shorter so it’s easier to use), then place it on the ferrule.

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Use a hammer to bang the ferrule down the shaft.  Don’t hammer too hard, just a little tap at a time.

If you go too far down and it gets stuck for good, you might want to try bang it down the opposite way but use something plastic to wedge it on the other side 45 degrees.  (Watch my wood installation video as I get it down too far.)

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Don’t try to get it all the way to your mark btw, you can get it almost there, then fit your clubhead and start banging the clubhead until it pushed the ferrule in place.

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How to Install/Epoxy the Clubhead to the Shaft!

Next, once you are done getting the ferrule in place, let’s prep up the shaft for installing the clubhead.

Take a small piece of sand paper and sand  the shaft until it’s nicely “sanded”.  Of course, if you have a sand belt and machine tools, use that too.

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The shaft tip is now ready for epoxying the clubhead on:

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Next, squeeze out some epoxy and mix it with a toothpick.

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Once mixed, apply the epoxy mix to the tip of the shaft.

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Now slide the clubhead down the tip of the shaft and you should be done, make sure to wipe off any excess epoxy with a cloth.  Don’t use paper towel as it will get stuck on the club and make an ugly mess.

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Depending on the epoxy you got, it might take couple minutes before the epoxy settles.  You can carefully install the grip right away or wait couple minutes to make sure the clubhead doesn’t move.

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Video of Ferrule Installation:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

How to Install the Golf Grip!

Yey, you are almost done and installing golf grip is one of the easiest jobs so this might also be helpful if you have old golf grips and you want to install new grips.

First, you willl want to measure out and mark where you want to stick the double-sided grip tape on the shaft.

Take the end of the shaft and place the junior golf grip side-by-side.  Mark with a permanent marker where the grip ends on the shaft.

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Put the grip tape on the shaft and take off the unsticky sticker thingee.
*Note – You can also do double or triple layers of the grip tape if you’ve cut the shaft a LOT or you simply want a larger grip.

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Next, get the golf grip and cover the hole at the butt end of the grip with a ball marker or a golf tee like this:

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Then put a small bit of soap, I used regular handwashing dish soap here.

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Fill the grip with warm water and shake it so you get soapy mix.

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Now, pour that water over the double-sided grip tape you applied to your shaft.

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Put the grip on the shaft now, noting that the logo(or whatever mark you want on the grip) is aligned with the leading edge of the clubface. (or parallel to it)

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Once the grip is all the way in, you can pull the ball marker (or golf tee) out, you should hear a nice “swoosh”!

You can also adjust the grip once it’s on the shaft, you have approximately 30 minutes before the soap water starts drying off so make your adjustments here.

After everything is done, set the golf clubs against a wall for at least 12 hours before testing it out on the course.

If you are in a hurry, you could go out to the range in couple hours but probably best idea to let the epoxy cure enough and the grip to dry off completely.

Video of how to install the golf grip:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

You should get something like these two clubs:

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Congrats!  After making a couple of these clubs, it shoudn’t take you longer than 5 minutes to make a golf club.

As you can see, golf club making is relatively easy and you can save a lot of money too in the process.

Even if you don’t use this guide, I am sure you have friends who are avid golfers and perhaps you can tell  your friends about it.  Thanks!

Here’s more videos for reference:

How to Install a Toddler’s Golf Club – Wood Driver:

Click Here to View in Full Screen Mode

How to Hit Those Short Chip/Pitch Shots out of Medium/Tough Rough!

Monday, August 31st, 2009

rough

(Image Credit)

Today I practiced 20-50 yard pitch shots at my favorite public course Harding Park with my 60 degree wedge.  Since Harding Park will be hosting the 2009 President’s Cup this year in October, the greenskeeper was growing the grass like mad.

Anyways, those long rough conditions allowed me to practice those tough shots and here’s simple tips next time you see some of those medium to high length rough:

  1. Set up to the ball with your clubface open, anywhere from 5 to 45 degrees depending on how high you want to hit your pitch shot.
  2. Set up with most of your weight on the left side of your body and keep it there during the whole pitch shot.
  3. Try to hit slightly behind the ball.  The long rough will actually act as cushion and add a little “bounce” to your shot, meaning you actually want to hit a little behind it to hit the ball consistently.   You want to hit about 1/4 to 1/8 inch behind the ball but no more than 1/4 inch, otherwise you will end up flopping the pitch shot.  Just make sure to keep your eyes 1/4 inch behind the ball and try to hit that spot, not the ball.  This will ensure you don’t “skull” the ball while you will get a consistent results out of any medium to long-sized rough.
  4. Make sure to keep your pitch swing nice and smooth, free flowing while keeping your hands super light.
  5. Make sure your follow-through is much longer than your backswing to ensure acceleration through the pitch shot.

Now, apply these tips next time you go out to the practice green.  I tend to like to spend a lot of time around the greens, not much of a ball-banger anymore (I used to be).  But I can assure you that when you can hit well and consistently close to the hole out of these medium to long-sized grass, you will definitely play better next time you play a good course like Harding Park.

Of course, hitting behind the ball only applies to 1 inches of grass(rough) or longer.  Anything shorter, you can keep your weight evenly distributed and focus on the front of the ball itself. (otherwise you will flub it for sure)

These shots are not easy but they are really fun if you master them and you will have a great advantage over your playing partners, especially if they are not accustomed to hitting those pitch shots within 3 feet circle like you do.

Have fun practicing and I should have some more tips on various different pitch shots.  (And yes, practicing with 1-ball can help greatly to these shots as you will learn to manipulate your 60 degree wedges better.)

How to Swing Better by Not Being Perfect!

Wednesday, August 19th, 2009

Sometimes, perfection can be the root of all evil things in a golf swing.  A lot of times when I was playing competitively on a daily basis, I would try to perfect my golf swing by banging 10 buckets of balls.  I would have probably done better if I just relaxed more and focused more on my short game and putting.

Golf is a game that requires great mental focus, it’s a not a game where the best golf swing mechanics win tournaments.  Rather, golfers with ability to turn the golf course into their friend wins as evidenced by Y.E. Yang’s win over Tiger last weekend.

That said, I hit balls for the first time in about 3 months yesterday and boy, I hit the ball really, really good.

Here’s something I tried to do yesterday:

  • I tried to not be perfect, simply relax my hands and let my body do the work.
  • My swing though consisted of “keep it smooth” like Fred Couples.
  • Worked on specific shots that would help me on the golf course like fading the ball (which is my strength) and odd shots that could get me out of trouble.

In all, yesterday’s practice at the driving range might have helped me whole lot more than me simply banging a lot of balls mindlessly one after another.

The key to great golf is keeping your golf swing consistent.   The only way an average golfer who rarely practices to keep their golf swing consistent is to keep their swing thoughts simple.

Golf has so many parts to master but unless you are a professional golfer with all the time in the world, you are not going to master it.

Forget “fixing” your swing and try simply “scoring” with your current golf swing.  Whatever your bad shots are, a nasty hook or banana slice, you can still “score” well by adjusting to your weaknesses and using them as strengths.

I’ve seen it a gazillion times where a golfer with a really weird swing will win over a golfer who has a perfect swing.  Most of the time, the golfer with a really weird swing has an incredible short game and a knack for putting since he/she is hitting the ball all over the place.  The golfer with perfect swing usually never performs under pressure because he/she simply does not know how to deal with trouble under pressure.

Anyways, I will be heading over to the course more often before this summer ends and looks like they got the tent set up at Harding Park for the President’s Cup 2009 this year. (I have an incredible view of the 12th hole at Harding Park from my 12th floor apartment!)

Golf Tip – How To Eat Right While Playing Golf!

Thursday, July 30th, 2009

This is sorta important what, “what you eat, what you become.”

It’s true.  In golf, you need to eat right while playing golf because it’s going to seriously affect how well you play, especially when under the gun such as tournament pressure or even skins game.

First of all, do NOT eat a full meal right before you tee off.   That will most likely cause you to be a little bloated and will certainly take couple holes before your stomach digests all the food.  By then, you probably have lost couple strokes you could have saved by not eating so much.

On the bright side, you can eat a lot of healthy snacks while playing golf such as banana or any type of “fruits” that contain natural sugar.  Try to stay away from coffee or anything with too much sugar as you can get “high” off the caffeine and sugar.

Watch the best pro golfers play on TV, rarely do you see them eating a snickers bar but they will be eating a lot of bananas.

I’ve probably read 10 golf books already on tournament golf nutrition and they all pretty much say the same things, eat lots of fruit that will keep your mental state level.

Now these are advices for people who want to score better on the golf course, if you do not care about playing your best,  you can ignore my advice.

What about the meal the night before a big tournament?

I have gone through many of these myself, I try to stick with high-carb meals as they can help you the next day.

My favorite meal is actually spaghetti, eating a lot of spaghetti the night before can surely help you the next day to keep going longer.

Lastly, don’t forget to drink LOTS of water while playing golf, especially if it’s a sunny day.

I have personally experienced “cramps” during a the high school state tournament before, that was simply due to not drinking enough water and eating bananas.  Bananas can help prevent cramps on a hot day because they contain potassium.  Take my advice and make sure to pack your golf bag with enough water and bananas for your next important golf tournament.

How to Get Your Kids Ready for Pro Golf!

Monday, June 22nd, 2009

Last time, I did a short post on how getting your baby/toddler/kids started early in golf has a lot to do with their success when they grow up to be an adult.

Well, that is true, you want to get your kids started in golf ASAP, even if your kids don’t end up playing golf the rest  of their lives, having the learned golf early in life will help them to enjoy and play golf as well as possible.

The other day, I hit a milestone in my life, I realized that I have actually got myself “ready” for the PGA Tour.

How?

Well, I found a way to make residual income from my blogging business.  Which is great since I can pretty much control my own time, meaning I will be hitting up the links any time I want.

Now, a lot of my pro golfer colleagues who decided to keep playing mini-tours have gone dry.  Basically, they didn’t win enough to pay for their expenses and living costs and ran out of money.

That’s right, I will tell you right now that the best insurance against failing in pro golf is money.  Of course, great players who at least win 1 PGA Tour tournament is going to have enough money to keep trying until they win their next one.  There’s a lot of those folks too except those players probably only make up a small fraction  of all the pro golfers in the world.

So what really happens to those pro golfers who run out of money?

Nothing, absolutely nothing.  Nothing happens to them because they run out of money and can’t play in tournaments anymore.  Maybe they will keep trying but most of them will end up starting life all over again with a job.

The most profound advice I can give your 12 year old or even 18 year old kid is that you need to learn to make money too with something other than golf.

Think of it as a side job or insurance  you can depend on.

I am not talking about a college degree here, that’s easy but I am actually talking about bringing in hard, cold cash without the use of golf clubs.

In the best possible scenario, your kid can get a golf scholarship to college, finish Top 10 in NCAA, and go straight to the PGA Tour with sponsorship from Nike.

LMAO, that certainly doesn’t happen unless you are handful of players in the world.  If your kids on this route and he/she’s that good, you can stop reading this post right now.

But if you are seriously passionate about your kid becoming a professional golfer, then read on.

Becoming a professional golfer on the PGA or LPGA Tour isn’t hard if you have the next 30 years to keep trying and trying.  The hard part is that most pro golfers run out of money while trying whether that be 1 year or 10 years.

Now, if your kid had enough money to keep going until he/she turns 50, I am 100% positive your kid will make it to the Tour, unless he/she simply sucks at golf and never improves. (or lazy)

That being said, a lot of great college golfers never end up on the PGA/LPGA Tour, simply because they get a job, get caught up with life, have kids, and their dream changes.

Don’t let that happen to your kids, let them learn other ways to fund their dreams.

I am not saying here that you should set up a trust fund for your kids so that they can keep trying out for the Tour until they reach 50.

What I am saying here is to teach your kids to catch fish.

Feed your kids fish and they will keep waiting for you to give them fish.

Teach your kids how to fish and they will probably find a way to the Tour.

I’ve seen hundreds of talented young golfers on the mini-tour.  Most of them will never make it mainly because they don’t have enough money to keep trying.

For example, if you are a real estate millionaire, you should teach your kids how to make millions of dollars on the side with real estate.  Even if your kids don’t make it to the Tour, at least they can take couple years off and make millions on real estate.

The greatest beauty of golf is that most pro golfers peak at mid 30s or even 40s.  One of the greatest golfers in history of golf, if not the greatest, Ben Hogan, didn’t start winning majors until he was past 30.

There’s always plenty time to play professional golf in one’s life, you simply need to have enough time and money to do it.

With that said, I am finally announcing my come-back in life to play pro golf again or at least keep trying every year for the PGA Tour.

If I didn’t keep trying to start my own business, this day would not have come.

While most of my colleagues are busy finding jobs after failing to make the PGA Tour in the last 2-5 years, I have finally got myself together to keep trying again.

My advice to you on raising the next PGA star, “Teach your kids how to make residual income whether that’s blogging, real-estate, or whatever.  Once your kids can learn to feed themselves without working at a corporate job 9 to 5, that’s when your kids will be able to keeping hitting those golf balls rest of their life and make it to the PGA/LPGA Tour some day”.

I’ve seen a handful of talent that go wasted, don’t let that happen to your kids.

Don’t take a chance that your kids will be the lucky ones that receive sponsorships out of college.

My last words?

I am that very kid who kept playing competitively until one day I ran out of money.  Of course, I had to learn all this advice through trial and error but eventually, I found a way to earn residual income and control my life.  The earlier you can do this, the longer you can play professional golf.

If your kid’s as passionate about golf as I am, he/she’s going to need this advice.  Think of it as “insurance” for your kids.  No matter what, your kids will be a fun life, playing more golf than the rest of the population.

Well, just something to think about.

Most start-ups these days don’t make it because they run out of money to keep going, not because their ideas suck.  Likewise, your pro-aspiring kids can make it to the Tour eventually, they simply need a way to finance their dreams for the next 30-40 years, not just 2-5 years.

Okay, I will stop here but now you know your job as a parent and how to get your kids to keep trying until they make it.

P.S. I know about a dozen great pro golfers who would have won dozen PGA Tour tournaments if they had money to keep going.  Money is the only thing holding them back.  If you have enough money to bet on every spot in roulette, you’d win at least once.  Likewise, if you have enough money to keep trying for the PGA Tour for the next 30 years, you will make it. :)

Next time, I will do a blog post on how to market your pro-golf career with a blog I think.  Something I didn’t do but could possibly build your fan base and enough money to keep your pro-golfing career going.